Tag Archives: Bytecoin

Bytecoin is still kicking…


Just a quickie, before you throw yourself under the bus…

Today, I received a response to one of my blogs about Bytecoin. It was a link to video, an audio actually, of an interview with the mysterious Jenny Goldberg. Goldberg is the new Community Manager, if we can accept this — of Bytecoin.

(Hi, Jenny.)

The connection seemed to skip or warble at times and Jenny herself, to an American, had a strange accent. I’m no ‘world traveler’ and I could not place it.

I also checked Reddit and the video was also posted there.

As some of you may recall, I often blog about various coins, especially the more anonymous ones, because I think at some point, many in the cryptosphere will actually desire a more secure and less public coin. Meaning, a cryptocurrency that is usable by anyone but not visible to everyone all the time — like bitcoin.

It’s a move simply waiting to happen. The developers have been gearing up for it.

In the mean time, there will be a large number of people who will desire the services of an anonymous coin network now. They come in several flavors of dishonest, but the bulk I feel, will be derived from the honest. Those simply trying to find a way to move and/or store value (money) in a place where others, including governments, cannot get to it.

Think on that for a moment. Let me name a few places. China. Russia. North Korea. The United States of Taxes. Cuba. Greece. Cyprus. Venezuela. Planet Earth.

The thing is, I don’t want people to get screwed. That’s why this video I mentioned is important to hear. First, do a little homework. Learn about Bytecoin. Determine for yourself, if Monero is simply trying bash a good system. And I have spoken highly of Monero in the past. Now I’m more neutral.

Secondly, make your own educated decision. Is Bytecoin good to use? Can you send value over the internet in a secure fashion, with Bytecoin. The quick answer is yes, you can. The system does work, but be fast about it. Transfer and get out of it as fast as possible — if you must use it at all.

You want to retain as much value as possible, after all. Let someone else take the risk of “holding” any cryptocurrency. It’s like holding a greased pig on crack cocaine, while drinking a beer and talking to your wife about painting the downstairs — again. It is nearly stupid, for now. Even bitcoin holders might find themselves in a world of poop, if the market decides that crypto is “old hat.”

I’m not saying to stop making money. Go for it. Spin that dial and laugh. I am. For now. Just know that the next idea is just around that dark intersection — where the bus is coming.

And listen to regular people. Too many times we gravitate to the news fed to us. I even cite them in my posts. This magazine or that financial expert. Know that in this vein, the blood that runs herein is not necessarily blue. The value if these things is transitory as hell. And the last time I looked, Satan’s Pit of Boiling Mud (think Yellowstone National Park) is still looking for permanent tourists.

And for the record, I’m curious as hell about NAVCOIN these days.

Have a good day.

Jack Shorebird

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

So, Where is Mr. Bytecoin?


There’s no meat on these bones, but fish as you please.

Recently, within the past few weeks, maybe a bit longer, Bytecoin.org has attempted or is attempting to make yet another comeback. Not unlike the comeback kid. And since I’m an avid crypto-junkie, having immersed myself in this sphere of innovation since Satoshi was wet behind the ears, I figured that a bit of advice is in order. If you feel Bytecoin is without sin, stop reading this blog now.

Why do I care? In my last life I caught bad guys. It’s in my nature I guess — to keep after them. And when some jerk wise-mouths me, like DStrangeM from Reddit did, well then, he has it coming.

In my last life I gathered the evidence, took the statements, pointed the gun, cuffed the perps, dragged them to jail, went to court and bled the blood. Not in that order of course, but it irks me, to say it nicely, when a bunch of alleged cryptocurrency developers — or those purporting to be thus — have the gall to cry foul when any regular citizen (me) asks for a smidgen of proof. They whine and moan. Why do you pee on my pump, they scream? It is always the same. Then again, in the back of my mind, that little voice asks, could they be innocent?

A new name has surfaced on the Bytecoin Reddit: Jenny Goldberg. No bio offered. She’s the “Community Manager” and BCN_official, we are advised, as of sixteen days ago. Her name does not appear on the Bytecoin.org website that I can find. (As indicated in the comments below — Goldberg’s name does appear on the Bytecoin.org Contact Page, just not under the Teto-Team page.)

Goldberg is on Reddit and I’m sure she’s on Telegram and Slack, but that does not verify that she has anything to with Bytecoin original Teto-Team — if said team ever really existed. It’s not even close to a confirmation, even if she will (or someone will) respond to emails sent to Contact@Bytecoin.org — which is the listed email for the Bytecoin.org webpage. Too easy to buy and sell email addresses these days — and websites.

Jenny offered this under the heading “BCN_Official”:

Dear BCN community,

My name is Jenny Goldberg and I’m the official BCN community manager

From this moment on, the official Bytecoin team will be making an effort to be more transparent to the community. We’ve been following all the activity in the community and we know you’ve been waiting for us to make a public statement. We see that there are lots of questions and we are now here to answer.

But firstly let me express my gratitude to all those enthusiasts who have made such valuable contributions to the development of BCN. We are so grateful for all the work put in by @Leogheo and BFB program team, @kinlakinla for the Bytecoin info page, @GaboCarranza and @sydney40 for Bytecointalk activity, @july for the Telegram channel, @boomworking for help with the design and @Camilo_Gil for your sincere appeal to our team. Thanks to the entire community for your trust and support even when you didn’t hear from us. Only with your support we were able to keep up our strength and continue working.

Just a few words about our history, Bytecoin is the first coin developed under the cryptonote protocol, but due to the fragmented nature of the community, BCN was forked a million times. You know that sometimes we were criticized for “slow development”, but the truth is that when the others were spending time on marketing, we were putting all our effort into enhancing the already existing cryptocurrency ecosystem.

In any case, we’re still here and we’re looking to grow. We would like to invite the best cryptographers, developers, bright minds and passionate hearts to join our BCN team to create absolutely new and exciting developments – get ready for the BCN of the new era. To ensure our success in this new era, we’ll need to support and trust each other and make our community even stronger.

Starting now, we are open for communication. Feel free to share your thoughts, bugs and features with us. Please send all feedback to contact@bytecoin.org and we’ll get back to you asap. We will do our best to bring the best ideas to life.

Let’s start a new chapter of Bytecoin together!

Source: Reddit

The only other Admin name on the Reddit for BytecoinBCN is our illustrious DStrangeM, who is a bit miffed at me today. (Hi, DStrangeM! I’m Danesjold on Reddit, by the way…) We are not even certain if DStrangeM is the DStrange, as is mentioned on the Bytecoin.org website. And does it matter anyway?

There are so many twists and turns.

From Bytecoin.org:

DStrange - Copy

Oh what a tangled web we weave when we practice to deceive.

And just who is DStrange or DStrangeM? Good question. But don’t worry, they/he/she — has your fiscal interests at heart. Are you certain?

The Bytecoin_BCN Twitter feed suddenly became active after nearly a year in slumber. How does that make you feel? There was an April 25, 2016 tweet then silence, until July 28, 2017. Announcements indicated that there was now a Telegram Group and a Slack Channel. The thing is, we really don’t know if these new groups have anything to do with the original developers of Bytecoin.

There is also the Bytecoin.org Twitter feed with tweets beginning on January 14, 2017. Why are there two feeds like this? Which one is official? Both? Neither? Half and half?

There is also the new Bytecoin Trading Community (Exchange). I found this out by accident. A Redditor advised me. (Thanks.) Anyway, according to Scamadviser, the site is 68 days old. It’s ownership is hidden, but what do we expect from a “secret” coin, right? For now the site’s reputation is pending. In other words, we will see.

A bad bit of news which continues to slow down any real progress, is the Poloniex issue. They are, for all intents and purposes, blocking BCN deposits and withdrawals. This has been going on for some time…over a month. (Longer according to Goldberg.) I’ve yet to hear a clear reason why, other than the recent mining issue, when extra BCN were created by a bad actor. Bytecoin did not rollback the blockchain to “unsteal” the coins. And I am uncertain now, if Bytecoin ever really fixed the flaw. I will need some expert, disinterested party to confirm this. (Not DStrangeM.)

What is my take on all of this, having spent decades bringing scum to justice? That these guys — that the people listed on Bytecoin.org as the Teto-Team do not exist. They never have. Prove me wrong. Come forward. Just one of you. I dare you.

I assert that the CryptoNote.org website is a farce. Has always been a front. But the code…is good. Now doesn’t that rankle your spuds? Again, if I am wrong, correct me. I will gladly print a retraction. I will be your biggest fan, if you can clear the “air.”

But I expect no answer. There are no men in the room. Only fluffy pony had the gumption. (Inside joke. If you don’t get it, get out of crypto, yesterday.)

So where is Mr. Bytecoin?

Answer: We must keep our identities secret, the governments are after us.

In those immortal words: “That dog don’t hunt.”

Have a spine.

In the end, which is where I hope all the noobs don’t take it, Bytecoin’s past is biting the heck out of their backside. Read a few more of my posts here. Surf the net and catch a few really stinky byte-fish, before you get caught, in what I believe will be yet another sucker’s rally.

Or chance it and prove me wrong.

But, unlike John McAfee, I will not consume my privates, if Bytecoin surges to the bitcoin spot or even gives Litecoin a run for the money.

Have a good day or night, as the case may be.

Jack Shorebird.

 


Note: This blog has been edited to reflect the comments through August 11, 2017.

 

 

Cryptocurrency Predictions From Experts?

Ball


Expertise

Is anyone really — I mean really, really, really — an expert when it comes to cryptocurrency? Even the experts don’t agree what cryptocurrency means. Is it a tool? A convenient form of functional money — like a check with drawing rights. But rights to what?

This aside, what are the latest prognostications from experts? Try these:

  • Balaji Srinivasan, CEO of 21.co
  • Peter Smith, CEO of Blockchain
  • Kathleen Breitman, CEO of Tezos

Bitcoin, the Master

Like all “experts” in this relatively new field, the implication is that bitcoin and Ethereum have staying power is common-speak. A five to ten year future window of opportunity seems to be the consensus — even given the current problems associated with bitcoin. That belief — almost a religion — is nothing new. It is going to make these experts look like digital noobs, if on July 31, 2017 or even down the road a piece,  bitcoin forks anyway. By then I’m sure they will have edited their theories.

There can be only one — or something like that…

New cryptocurrencies will come along and become successful. Some currently unheard of technology could dominate the market. Again, this seems obvious. That’s why we have a thing called progress. Can we be less obtuse here and stop pandering to noob-ville.

Rich Man, Poor Man, Fraud Man?

People will become rich and poor as new cryptocurrencies enter this space. As a result of the people who lose money due to fraudulent enterprises, more regulation seems to be in the offing.

No kidding?

In fact, Ripple may be implying that markets are heavily regulated for a reason. This is yet another eyebrow raiser. Ripple went to the dark side early in the game and is no doubt leveraging its position against the “free” cryptocurrencies as they themselves struggle to become a meaningful player in the cryptosphere. One wonders if they will soon apply for monopolistic benefits. Perhaps become one with “Fedcoin,” in the United States of America.

The Cashless Prison

Cryptocurrency must not be private? Regulation will eventually take over.

The critical component required by governments is ultimately, a cashless system whereby — allegedly — everyone can be more secure. The problem is, one has no privacy in this scenario, no right to life, liberty and, in the end, no private property — even digital property. How can one be even remotely free if every personal transaction is cataloged by the state, controlled by bureaucrats and dictated by the political wind?

Benevolent Big Brothers

Speculation in cryptocurrencies will lessen as certain altcoins become more stable. That bitcoins are not just for drugs.

Right. Got it.

This bit of speculation is a bit disingenuous. In fact, it’s just a set up. Stated to entice the under-educated. The noobs. To hint again, that appropriate rules to unmask the users of cryptocurrencies will magically enable a virtual world-utilization of cryptocurrencies, especially when new “killer apps” come online. All will be well, so long as we obey.

Conversely, it can be argued that the instability of cryptocurrencies are in part, caused by the states themselves. Take China for example. That bastion of corruption on one hand implies that bitcoin miners will be heavily regulated and on the other, they are allowed to profit. Do you hear “payoff?”

Since China purportedly manages most of the bitcoin blockchain, is it any wonder that it bitcoin is inherently unstable? And we all see what happens when bitcoin catches a cold — almost all other relevant cryptocurrencies nosedive.

In support of the move away from state controlled cryptocurrency, things like Bytecoin, Monero and Aeon were born — and many others — in an ongoing attempt to remind the minders that well, all of the people have not rolled over and played dead — just yet.

The Silly Con

Silicon Valley will become a direct competitor to Wall Street. This seems straightforward. As computer technology advances, its underlying information infrastructure will continue lubricate the wheels of finance. All of the major trading floors, worldwide are already supported by the latest Fintech. But the assumption here is much deeper. That the technology itself will make Wall Street, for all practical purposes, passé.

Imagine that for a moment. Not that all the brokers and lawyers would be replaced by smart contracts, but that the wheels of finance themselves are replaced with cryptocurrency. Where paper money, fiat currency, the Federal Reserve, are at once, relics of a bygone age.

Do you take VISA?

Competition will force the old guard — say MasterCard and Visa — to step up. In other words, if bitcoin or any cryptocurrency, can one day compete with the current regulated entities then and only then, would the need arise for the old guard to “improve.” That or be ushered out.

The only problem is, bitcoin is currently too slow to compete with the current credit based entities, except where it comes to moving large amounts of money across borders cheaply. A point that is often ignored. They don’t want to remind anyone that there are inexpensive ways to do big business.

Micro-transactions are all the rage today — supposedly — but when it comes down to the “golden” tacks, if one can move 200,000,000 dollars in ten minutes or less, across 50 borders, without taxes or banking fees, well, who needs bitcoin “micro?” We have Iota for that anyway and they are cheaper — better at the small stuff. Maybe better at all the crypto stuff.

Quantum Query

One should remember that technology is advancing. Governments worldwide are working on systems — quantum computers — which, if true, can crack cryptocurrency addresses — take your funds — in about a minute. It might therefore behoove one, if cryptocurrency seems a lucrative investment, to study the next generation of altcoins which are resistant or even immune to the quantum “state” hackers. Maybe Iota, but there are others.

This being said, if governments cannot get what they want, if they cannot control the newest generations of non-state currencies, they would need to make them irrelevant by installing a better form of money, perhaps by privatizing the banking industry altogether or by controlling the internet, radio waves, WiFi etc. At last resort, Big Brother would require draconian laws, like those in North Korea, and the dismantling of technology altogether.

Absent a total crackdown against cryptocurrency, there are other more curious ways to thwart the ever growing popularity of the expanding cryptosphere: government sponsored hacks, thefts, 51% attacks and so on.

It is interesting of late, how many cryptocurrency exchanges, wallets, etc., are being hacked. The newest one today? Veritaseum, to the tune of eight million dollars.


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bytecoin: The DStrange Con?

Money Drain

Money Drain

If you need to boost your customer base, sell more goods — more crypto — what do you do? Hire a “PR” guy, right? Or pretend to hire one. I mean, on the internet one can create any number of what are called “sock puppet” accounts. Additional emails and user names for various social networking websites to make it appear as if many people are behind the scenes — hiding in the deep dark web — working hard to make things happen.

A bit of Bytecoin history that might be fiction is in order to help us understand the Bytecoin outlook. A short re-hash. In any event, in makes for a good story. The personalities in this space are colorful, but think of cardboard cutouts. Think of characters in a book — a book of fiction. Think about keeping your money while you are at it. Even if the Chinese own Bitcoin, maybe you’d better just wait and see.

I have often wondered what it is that has brought me here to the Bytecoin.org doorstep. It’s the mystery of course. The not knowing. It bothers me. And maybe that’s the lure or the pull, if you will. Is it a marketing method? No, I doubt that. I doubt that all of the mystery surrounding Bytecoin is meant to make us feel protected — secure in our monies. Our crypto. No matter how great the code may be, there are simply too many red flags to ignore.

The mystery is what it is. A lack of information which has led to multiple inquires going back since at least 2012. Now ask yourself what kind of people do not want you to obtain information about them? Are they the crypto-saviors or just the opposite? Scammers — criminals — or at the very least unethical developers bent on fast profits and a slow exit?

The point is, when some of us smell a rat or a bunch of them — even if they are living in a palace of fantastic code-cheese (that’s a slight reference to “Cheesus” — a mod on the Bytecoin Forum as well as BitcoinTalk) — well, we investigate. And I may have praised certain aspects of BCN in the past, but now is the season — once again — to hunt. To hunt and to make crypto-enthusiasts aware that scammers are alive and feasting — have been — for years in this Wild West environment. An environment where cheap cryptos entice the buyers, who only later discover that the shear number of BCN coins prevents any giant pumps. And that is just as well, since quick profits are just as easy to come by as quick losses.

Take DStrange. A character. A fiction? Yet another pseudonymous ghost. A Bytecoin promoter — who rarely promotes. You’ll find him listed under the Teto-Team at Bytecoin.org. He is a recent member, allegedly. Meaning he came after the rest of them. If you peruse the Bitcointalk forums you will find a trove of information which dovetails with the Bytecoin developers, going back to 2014. You will find argument after argument, accusations fly — and always the Bytecoin Team loses. DStrange loses. Rias loses. Cheesus loses. They are never able to explain why they — or Bytecoin — chose certain “dark” paths. Why Bytecoin essentially made the lion’s share of the coins for themselves, under optimal conditions.

Why is DStrange so curious, however? Because few people have ever had any contact with the Bytecoin Team. There’s a load of theories and maybe I will explore some in the future, but for now I’d like to focus on DStrange. Apparently, if you have questions, he might help. Maybe Cheesus will too. Praise the Lord! If he is still around.

We can see on the Bytecoin.org website — if true — that DStrange is a public relations guy with a major in Management / Psychology. He has a Master’s Degree in Management, from Erasmus University in Rotterdam — in Europe.  Rotterdam is in the Netherlands, for those who may not know. And all of this is “academic” as they say. Why? Again, DStrange is not likely David Miller — and he probably never attended Erasmus. Naturally, if I’m wrong, please — oh please — correct me. Show me the evidence and the error of my ways; and I will retract these accusatory words.

DStrange recently joined the team in a high action. Besides public relations DStrange develops further Bytecoin applications for business.

This is what Bytecoin.org offers us by way of a short bio — regarding DStrange. We can see that not only is DStrange a public relations guy, but he is also a developer of Bytecoin applications. Again, we must take this on faith. Oh, and ask politely for a single example of an application created by DStrange. Just one.

If we go back to the BitcoinTalk Forum to May 16, 2014, we can find an exchange between DStrange, who is also listed as David Miller, with an email address of Dstrange.m@gmail.com — and the Bytecoin Team. If you check the email address of DStrange on this verification service, you will see that DStrange’s Trust Score is 7.25. By comparison, my Trust Score for my email address (jgshorebird@gmail.com) on the same service, is only 5.5. Maybe it’s because this is not my primary email address.

DStrange’s trust score is much worse on BitcoinTalk, however. User fluffypony (Riccardo Spagni) of Monero fame, has even linked the user rethink-your-strategy’s post detailing the Bytecoin scam. (Warning: the writer is pissed.)

At any rate, DStrange is one of the few people who will actually answer the phone, so to speak. I’ve confirmed that at least he does respond on Reddit. His user name there is DStrangeM — again, if it’s not a sock puppet account.

At this point, if DStrange ever reads this blog, I’d like to ask him to tell me if he lives in the Netherlands (Holland?). It is interesting that ScamAdviser.com gives us a 2% chance that the Bytecoin.org website is in the Netherlands. Is that a result of DStrange’s influence? Or is Bytecoin hidden there?

Smooth (developer at Monero and AEON) — a well known and respected user on the BitcoinTalk Forum and many others — has leveled many allegations against DStrange and other Bytecoin Team members. And against the early code itself. One important factor was addressed on May 17, 2014, as DStrange and others were posting in support of Bytecoin.

Smooth posted:

The “optimizations” are fairly absurd. They are better described as de-un-optimizations. The straightforward implementation of the algorithm is the optimized one, not the other way around. You’d have to go out of your way to make it as slow as it was. Several highly qualified people have commented along these lines already (ignore me, I don’t know what I’m talking about).

If we look at the latest round of de-un-optimizations, most of the history of the bytecoin premine comes down to just 4-8 PCs. Or a somewhat larger number over a shorter period of time. Really, that’s all.

This one post by Smooth (above) is perhaps the most challenging for the Bytecoin team to explain. Why would they “de-un-optimize?” Logically, to grab the lion’s share of BCN early on. Is that a bad thing? I mean it was their baby, right? Now think about that for a moment. If they used the extra money to develop the coin, since the price has surged of late — probably just speculators — then they could have plowed some of it back into R&D, right? Has the money ended up in the Cayman Islands or Panama instead? We don’t know. Why? They don’t talk much and when they do — they do not ever appear to defend themselves from all of the accusations. They have, as Americans put it:

Refused to incriminate themselves in any public way.

And the history of a thing cannot be undone. It has been years, but no reliable information has surfaced about Bytecoin (BCN). It has, in no uncertain terms, staunchly refused to explain all of the inconsistencies related to the launch of Bytecoin — the premine, the apparent falsified White Papers, the assertion that the “blockchain” verifies the launch date — and the list goes on. Until that time, until Bytecoin can remove the stench from it’s hidden launch, I might continue to regurgitate these forgotten memories in an effort to dissuade or at the very least, to make users extremely cautious about BCN.

It’s high time Bytecoin Team. If you have any guts, show us the money.

 


Image: Flickr

Bytecoin and the PACIFIC_SKYLINE “Ghost”

15116129817_0992beac90_k - Copy

Source: Flickr

This is an open letter to: PACIFIC_SKYLINE

Dear Sir/Ma’am:

I don’t usually write letters to ghosts, but this time I’ve made an exception. You see, I figure that one of these days a Teto-Team member will have had enough. I hope that today is that day. That today, a Bytecoin Team member will have the bleeping bleeps to respond to this open letter. Just to clear the cryptosphere.

I’m not necessarily tearing down the Bytecoin tech. I hear it’s cool beans. Really cutting edge stuff and I know Monero is stealing some of your thunder. They’ve even updated their website as well as your tech. I’m sure you’ve noticed. Doesn’t that irk you?

On the other hand, I also see the pumps and dumps associated with BCN. Millions flowing in quickly — being laundered? I hope not — and millions flowing out at speed. I don’t see that as much with the other children of BCN (Bytecoin).

We users of the Bytecoin system are once again staring at the Bytecoin Team Members list on Bytecoin.org and wondering if you, Mr. Pacific Skyline, really exist. If you ever really lived at all or if you are merely a fiction. You are aren’t you? A fiction…

I do not mind that you use an anonymous name or handle — if you are real. I would, however, enjoy a word or two. Perhaps a Tweet or even a response to this post would suffice. Make one. I dare you. Go public right now.

Maybe you would care to read my previous post about “Neocortex,” a.k.a. Joseph Lin. Maybe you would rather peruse my post about the “Seigen” mysteries. It doesn’t matter. What matters is that you kindly respond. That you post something under your name on the Bytecoin website or that you just come forward here and tell us who you really are. Or tell us something else. Talk about the weather where you are. Do you own a pet? What is your favorite drink? Vodka?

In the meantime I will attempt to determine who you are. Attempt, little by little, to show the Bytecoin users that you probably do not exist. That you are indeed “hot air” as in the kind used in an aerostat you allegedly desire. And if you do exist, I humbly apologize for calling you a ghost. But if the sheet fits…

“Pacific_skyline devoted his life to developing the technologies that will help humanity to realize its full potential. Bytecoin is the basis for several projects under his supervision. Among the earthly things, he’s interested in aeronautics and plans to obtain his own aerostat.”

That is your description. It’s kind of vague. Once again, the immediate reaction I get is the wording weirdness. When it states:

“…devoted his life…”

…it almost sounds as if you are dead. It’s kind of past tense. You should have them change that. Unless you are dead, but the following words seem to hint that you actually live. I mean if you are interested in aeronautics that would mean you are alive or is there a subtle hint again. Your bio mentions…

“…earthly things…”

Is that a hint that you are spiritual in some way? Or is there another hidden meaning here? Are you deceased? Are you unearthly?

And this vague bit of enlightenment is a tad strange:

“…developing the technologies that will help humanity to realize its full potential…”

Humanity realize its full potential? Don’t you know how that sounds? It sounds as if you are not human or that perhaps your work is so fantastic as to enrich all of us. But that is a tall order my friend. It seems to hint that you have one heck of an ego.

How so? How will your plan help all of us? In what vein? What kind of full potential are we talking about? Augmented humanity? Better spreadsheet technology? Monetary freedom? How about some clarity and a little less B.S.

If Bytecoin is (or was) the basis for some of your projects, can you give us a hint about any of them? Do they have anything to do with aerostats? And why do we care if you like to play with hot-air balloons. More dead-end nonsense, right?

How about your profession? Project Manager is it? And you majored in Computer Science Management at the University of Washington? You have an M.S. in Information Management. Great. Was that from the Paul G. Allen School? Can you be a little more specific, because I can’t seem to find that degree department at U of W.

And where did you get that name? From the “Pacific Skyline Council” in Foster City, California? Are you a Boy Scout?

Maybe you are making a reference to the musical group?

Let’s go back to November 5, 2015, shall we? The last known blog post from you on the Bytecoin website. Here you explained how we can make our own cryptocurrency and how:

“…creator has vision.”

And other mundane things.  Again, as an English speaker, I note the odd usage of the written language.  Missing conjunctions. Typo’s. All of these seem to hint at a Russian dialect, in my view. Or perhaps a bad Google Translator package. Are you really “Black Sea_Skyline” then? Come on, gimme some “pravda.” (Truth.)

Need some examples — again? How about this one:

“The first example that jumps to mind is the inventor of transistor.”

Dear Pacific_Skyline, how about adding an extra “the” before “transistor.” Clearly, given all of these types of mistakes, you are not from the United States. Were you an Exchange Student? And why is it that all of you — the Teto Team — seem to make the same kinds of English errors in your blogs? Are you all the same person? From the same region of the world? I’m certain any professional linguist could tell us much about you.

“The development itself is time and labor consuming process.”

Correction: “The development itself is “a time and labor consuming process.” But it’s still weird, even after I correct it. It’s wordy. How about: “The development is time consuming and laborious.” Is there a report writer on your staff? I mean I’m no editor, but I think you need one.

And these glaring English usage patterns persist throughout your other articles as well. The September 6, 2015 blog post has them. The July 24, 2015 blog has more. And I could go on, but I think you get the picture. You are not originally American. Not by a long shot, but you never said you were. You did, however, imply that you were. And why?

So, Pacific_Skyline, your identity remains intact, but your words define you. A great tech, such as Bytecoin — even with its recent glitches related to mining — cannot hide your fake bios. It’s high time to clean out your garage.

On the conspiracy side of the house, I hope you are not an operative, Pacific_Skyline. I hope you are not part of the NSA or some Russian apparatchik. I’m betting you are not, however. I’m betting you and your team are what you say you are.

We’ll see.


Image Source: Flickr

 

 

 

Bytecoin Team: The “Seigen” File

 

Who is “Seigen?”


Again, many of us have stared at the Bytecoin Team Members list on Bytecoin.org and wondered just who they were — or more precisely, who or what they are. Are they still around? Are they layered in pseudonyms to protect their identities or to hide criminal enterprise?

In a recent post I checked in on “Neocortex” or is that “Joseph Lin?” In any event, it is currently a dead-end and Mr. Lin has not responded to inquires — yet. Come to think of it, maybe Neocortex never existed, which means he can’t respond.

It’s so logical, it must be true, right?

So, in order to keep on task, I have randomly chosen another Bytecoin Team member for this post. For this ongoing ridicule.

Meet “Seigen,” the dashingly elegant “Go” player. He hails from…we don’t know.

What do we know about this monetary crusader? Zilch. Nada. Nothing. The big El-Zippo. And so many people think that’s dandy.

Let’s take this an “exhibit” at a time, shall we?

 

Exhibit A: “Go”

Why bring up the game of “Go?” Flavoring? To spice the mystery?


To understand this Seigen “handle” one needs to look at the artwork. Here is his “jpg” file on the Bytecoin website:

I guess it’s copyrighted somewhere. But you know, I’m not so sure. Maybe someone can write to me and verify this. I will happily remove the copied file and apologize to the owner or manager or whomever. I promise. Just let me know. Seriously.

Many of us know that the black and white picture presented here, is a representation of a “Go” board. It’s an ancient Chinese game. Probably the oldest board game in existence. It is more complex than chess, according to Wikipedia. The game-board is larger and there are more possible moves. Something like 250 moves versus 35, when compared to chess. And so the heck what.

I think a few Chess Masters would take issue with “Go,” but that is not the thrust of this post. I’m not here to pick a fight with them. Chess died with Bobby Fischer anyway, right?

It is curious, however, that the object of the game “Go” is to surround your opponent and capture his pieces. The game, historically, was for those of culture — the educated Chinese aristocrats, with nothing better to do.They played their educated games, whilst the white-rice eaters toiled in the paddies and their armies did the real fighting.

I mean at least in chess there’s a freaking point. Not an endless stone toss. But I digress. Let me “Go” on.

Is that what Bytecoin is trying to do? Play the long game — as it relates to the world of cryptocurrency? What Seigen wants us to think? “Dudes, I’m so complex. You know I’m good for it. I swear, once you buy a few million BCN, I’ll do some more work on the code.”

It is not all that interesting that the name “Seigen” appears to be a reference to the Chinese born Go Master, Wu Qingyuan. He is better known by his Japanese name,”Go Seigen.” He was considered a prodigy, but began his training in the “Stone-age art” at a relatively tender late age of nine. Apparently, he played with his stones a lot and that got him in the mood. Maybe his mother said “don’t throw the stones, place them on this board, whilst the Chinese Communists take all of our stuff. Don’t you feel better, Honey?”

At any rate, Go Seigen died. It was on November 30, 2014, after the invention of Bytecoin — whenever that was.

It is apparent that our mystery Bytecoin “Seigen” has chosen a pseudonym to imply a mastery of “Go” and maybe a little respect for the one of the fathers of the game. Oh, and that he is also mathematically inclined, hence a cryptographer. And that chess is for “sissies.”

Whoops, I can’t say “sissies” because it’s a sexist remark. (If you have a problem with that please consult your censor-hate-speech expert — have him or her contact me that I may print a full rebuttal.)

But to Seigen, chess sucks — or at least that is implied. At to that I say: blasphemy. Eat my rook, Seigen. Go and move those little Stone-age stones around the dirt you silly Asian guy-person.

 

Exhibit B: Ecole Polytechnique 

Education lets us know that Seigen is no dummy, but maybe we are… Do you feel that way or is it just me?


Obviously a PhD in Math from Ecole Polytechnique is great for the kind of work Seigen did or does, for Bytecoin and his bank. What bank or banks? Name one.

So where is this school anyway? It is probably a reference to the one by the same name in France. A university known for its engineers — a top notch school. So they say.

The school was once a military academy and it was founded during the French Revolution (in 1794). Hint: the revolution failed. Remember Napoleon?

Today the school is still supervised by the Ministry of Defense of France. Does that make you squeamish? Is there a hint of state sponsored silliness? Oui? I mean, I can see them now…drinking a little wine and coding a little crypto, can’t you?

 

Exhibit C: Data Protector Man

“Comrade, I hear you expert in banking sector, true? Can leap tall buildings in Red Square, da?”

— Anonymous Bytecoin Philanthropist (V.P. of Moscow)


In Seigen’s proffered bio, we learn that he is “…a data protection expert in banking sector.”

Read that one part again, slowly. It reads, in part “…in banking sector.”

Do you see it?

In some English speaking countries we would write it this way:

“…in “the” banking sector.”

It just flows better. Note that for next time comrade. Actually I don’t think it will matter. The Bytecoin website is full of such errors or shall I say, “differences?”

As I have stated before and some of my readers have pointed out…do we hear Russians? Dissidents? I mean I have no problem with the Russians, so long as they are nice ones. No state sponsored crypto-graphic con artists, please. And no pre-mining fakers either.

Of course, we ask the question: where? Where is this alleged data protection expert?  In France? In Dubai? Singapore? God forbid, in China? How about Moscow? How about on Star Trek?

Is Seigen just a fictional character? Methinks…Oui.

If we focus on France, we can speculate where Seigen might work. BNP Paribas? It’s one of the largest financial institutions in France. How about the Credit Agricole Group? And we could go on. We could go to Mother Russia and apply for an account at  Sberbank as well. Do they take BCN or do they just wash rubles? Sounds dirty either way, don’t you think?

My point here? There is not enough to go on, but maybe with all of this speculation, someone else might get curious. Some other bored cryptocurrency enthusiast will chime in with the goods.

Do you know a PhD from Ecole Polytechnique who works at your institution and loves to play “Go?” Is an expert at it? Do you know Clark Kent Jr.? How about Chewbacca?

If Seigen was one of the first Bytecoin members, how did he join? Does this elite list of Bytecoin Team members have anything to do with the Cicada 3301 mystery? How about space aliens? That smell in the back of my closet downstairs?

 

Exhibit D: Wisdom

Asian Philosophy? Really?

“Confucius say…many apples fall to ground when wind blows hard…”


Aside from his school and “Go” what else do we know — or think we know — about Seigen?

We are told that Seigen “has always been a source of calmness and Asian philosophical wisdom.” Oh, please.

Really? How nice. How calm.

And I don’t care. If Seigen is a source a calmness, then please fire him. We need men, not castrated Asian philosophers. Why? Because, my dear “Go” player, the Art of Financial War is upon you. If you seek the oneness, try opium and beer. Leave the sport for the money-changers.

Are we to feel comforted by Seigen’s ability to walk on water — in today’s fiat money  oceans? How so?

I mean the Bytecoin Team  — if it really exists — is making us think that Seigen is a great guy, a wonderful crypto-graphic artistic, slightly Asian, educated in Europe (seasoned) and therefore a great developer, and as smart as he is all-around  “philosophical.”

But lay it on a bit thicker won’t you? Don’t tease us. Does he wear sandals? Does he take baths? Can he walk my dog?

Again, it is like saying that Seigen — if he really exists — is a Buddhist-Banker Security Guard. Perhaps he is a Falun Gong practitioner, who works in Beijing, which is why he must keep his identity under wraps — lest the Communist Party take certain liberties with his unused kidneys, so to speak.

For sure, we have learned thus far, that Seigen’s recycled food does not stink. Jesus.

 

Exhibit E: Elegance

What word does not match the others?


Think about this for a minute. “Fundamental solution.” Sounds reasonable right? Something that is core to understanding the root issues. The bedrock. The basics. The real. The wind beneath my buttocks.

Now think “simple solution.” We’ve all heard it right? Occam’s Razor? Keep it short and simple. Why? It cuts down on errors and complexity. It’s not always the best solution, just the humanly understandable one.

We could argue all day, but we won’t Why? Because we have simplified it. Great. Next batch of word stew.

Elegant. As in Seigen offers elegant solutions too. Oh?

What? I said elegant. Do you mean artistic? Stylistic? Pretty?

I don’t think so, because the Bytecoin Team or Seigen, used the word “and.” It’s kind of a weaselly way of writing stuff.

Seigen “always emphasizes the need for fundamental, simple and elegant solutions.” Does he mean all three at once or any of them, individually?

Why does this bother me? Because of the word elegant. Pansies are elegant. (Oh, again with the flowery language.)

Yes, math and fundamentals can be elegant in a sense, but the word elegant is also a gray-brown smog word. It can mean anything. It’s subjective. Cryptography is objective at its core.

Hell, maybe I’m just being too critical. Bummer.

 

In conclusion:


Seigen does not exist.

He never did — as a single person.

Prove me wrong.

 

Seigen Tidbits:

These are some things laying around the net, related to Seigen…


Tidbit #1

Tidbit #2

Tidbit #3

 


Photograph Source: Flickr

Bytecoin: Who is Joseph Lin aka Neocortex?


Who is Joseph Lin?

Many of us have stared at the Bytecoin Team Members list on Bytecoin.org and wondered just who they were — or more precisely, who they are. Are they still around? Are they layered in pseudonyms to protect their identities? If so, why?

There are so many ways to search the internet that one can get lost in the noise of it. Sometimes it’s better to be obvious. In other words, you can ask the question of any number of search engines (Google, Mozilla FireFox, DuckDuckgo, or even TOR) and get a thousand answers, all speculation; or you can click around.

So click around. Try the “News” heading, instead of the “All” setting.

For example, you can begin with this article on Bytecoin.org:

The Proof-of-Work in Cryptocurencies: Brief Histroy. Part 2.”

The guest author is Ray Patterson, but don’t read the article. That’s not what I’m on about. Instead search for “Ray Patterson” and “Bytecoin” in quotes.

A little ways down in your search results you should see another article on Coin Telegraph.  It’s dated July 8, 2015. Follow this link:

A Proof of Work Evolution.”

Did you see the name associated with the article? Joseph Lin?

There it is, but is it? Is Joseph Lin really Neocortex of Bytecoin fame? Is he or was he really the lead programmer of Bytecoin. The fortepiano player who favors the works of composer Johann Bach. And who really cares if he plays with his organ?

If we can trust the name, Lin seems to be of Taiwanese descent, but he could just as easily be from China or any number of Asian countries. So we are no closer here. It’s like the name Smith or Jones.

We can explore Lin’s alleged Alma Mater: University of California, Berkeley. That’s a ride. Lin is a common name. Good luck.

The same goes for attempting to search Lin’s college or alleged degrees. There are so many possibilities.

Here are some curious tidbits, however.

July 9, 2015. Joseph Lin publishes…

Miners Lost Over $50,000 from the Bitcoin Hardfork Last Weekend.”

Was he trying to expose the weaknesses of Bitcoin then? Sure.

July 16, 2015. Joseph Lin pops ups again. This time commenting about DigitalNote in the this article:

Dissidents turn to bitcoin-like cryptocurrency to communicate free from state surveillance.”

Lin gives us some useful information. It is also curious that he cares about dissidents. This makes me think he is Chinese or maybe a Hong Konger. He’s chomping under the “bit” of oppression.

October 7, 2015. Here is another tantalizing clue:

“‘Neucoin Will Have More Consumers Using It Than Bitcoin within One Year’ – Founder.

Well, that didn’t happen, but again we find Joseph Lin lurking about. He apparently asked a question about Neucoin, but it went unanswered.

Then nothing. At least nothing obvious. Did something happen on October 7, 2015? Why did he drop from view?

My point here? There are so many bloggers out there who tell us that there are few if any leads to the mysterious Bytecoin Team Members. Here is one: Joseph Lin.

Can we track him or is this just another dead end?

How about you Joseph Lin aka Neocortex, do you care to respond?


 

If you liked this article and want more of the same, consider sending any amount of Bytecoin (BCN) to:

22WuwNdkFM1Xqg3etSVYtKcwhyLoQTXZ37EHVk4dJhtZSx3Csh5uoQbQVH78oswEbQH1Uanxe8CTW9qw4KxcSftTFubnfL8

Thanks.