Tag Archives: Business

Bytecoin is still kicking…


Just a quickie, before you throw yourself under the bus…

Today, I received a response to one of my blogs about Bytecoin. It was a link to video, an audio actually, of an interview with the mysterious Jenny Goldberg. Goldberg is the new Community Manager, if we can accept this — of Bytecoin.

(Hi, Jenny.)

The connection seemed to skip or warble at times and Jenny herself, to an American, had a strange accent. I’m no ‘world traveler’ and I could not place it.

I also checked Reddit and the video was also posted there.

As some of you may recall, I often blog about various coins, especially the more anonymous ones, because I think at some point, many in the cryptosphere will actually desire a more secure and less public coin. Meaning, a cryptocurrency that is usable by anyone but not visible to everyone all the time — like bitcoin.

It’s a move simply waiting to happen. The developers have been gearing up for it.

In the mean time, there will be a large number of people who will desire the services of an anonymous coin network now. They come in several flavors of dishonest, but the bulk I feel, will be derived from the honest. Those simply trying to find a way to move and/or store value (money) in a place where others, including governments, cannot get to it.

Think on that for a moment. Let me name a few places. China. Russia. North Korea. The United States of Taxes. Cuba. Greece. Cyprus. Venezuela. Planet Earth.

The thing is, I don’t want people to get screwed. That’s why this video I mentioned is important to hear. First, do a little homework. Learn about Bytecoin. Determine for yourself, if Monero is simply trying bash a good system. And I have spoken highly of Monero in the past. Now I’m more neutral.

Secondly, make your own educated decision. Is Bytecoin good to use? Can you send value over the internet in a secure fashion, with Bytecoin. The quick answer is yes, you can. The system does work, but be fast about it. Transfer and get out of it as fast as possible — if you must use it at all.

You want to retain as much value as possible, after all. Let someone else take the risk of “holding” any cryptocurrency. It’s like holding a greased pig on crack cocaine, while drinking a beer and talking to your wife about painting the downstairs — again. It is nearly stupid, for now. Even bitcoin holders might find themselves in a world of poop, if the market decides that crypto is “old hat.”

I’m not saying to stop making money. Go for it. Spin that dial and laugh. I am. For now. Just know that the next idea is just around that dark intersection — where the bus is coming.

And listen to regular people. Too many times we gravitate to the news fed to us. I even cite them in my posts. This magazine or that financial expert. Know that in this vein, the blood that runs herein is not necessarily blue. The value if these things is transitory as hell. And the last time I looked, Satan’s Pit of Boiling Mud (think Yellowstone National Park) is still looking for permanent tourists.

And for the record, I’m curious as hell about NAVCOIN these days.

Have a good day.

Jack Shorebird

 

 

 

 

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Where there is smoke there is Iota?


An open letter to Cryptocurrency fans, that is not investment advice. Please speak to your parents before you plop down your hard won lunch money on crypto.

Where there is smoke there is Iota?

For the crypto-enthusiast Iota is nothing new. It’s another cryptocurrency, albeit, one with great new tech, we are advised. Some call it the Bitcoin Killer. A new type of coin altogether, with a blockchain and a “tangle” and a new way of reaching consensus — to validate transactions. It’ll reach a ten billion market cap in no time, some say.

I’m no developer. Not a programmer. I knew a little Basic and Fortran in the deep dark past. But I have spent many man-hour-years using the various crpytocurrency wallets, hardware miners, exchanges, services and so on. I’ve learned a lot, from losing a lot and gaining a little. I tried to keep up with all the news, ICO’s, premine scams, discussions and government blow back.

So, as a layman, which I think many a crpyto-enthusiast is or was or will be, I like to give my two cents and in the process make a few cents in ad money when you read this — and hopefully, as a noob, maybe save yourself a few bucks and harsh words from your wife when she asks you why you dumped all of her vacation cash into crypto. (Yep, you’re in trouble now.)

I used to get right in there with all the bloggers or Redditors — and I still do — and say how great this coin or that idea seemed to be. I had no intention of pumping, but if I felt good about the coin, I’d say it. If I felt bad, I’d sell, then say it — nicely at first. To hint at others that maybe this coin was not so great, and here’s why. If I read about a particular coin, saw that its website was clunky, dead, had a lot of spelling errors (with some exceptions here), looked cheesy, I’d not even invest.

Another thing is the Bitcointalk.org page. If the coin’s page was well thought out, clean, understandable, with a community of serious people, so much the better.  If it’s disorganized, errors are abundant or if the developer’s comments are abrasive, over the top and ridiculous, then I ditched the coin. And yes I know that many great minds are jerks on the outside. If so, then they’d best get a partner to smooth out the people wrinkles. That goes for broad based appeals to the general public and also getting the German government, for example, on board. In a recent Iota video, such a process was discussed. Grants from Uncle Germany? Doesn’t make me feel good. When you obtain grants, you gather strings.

And then, after the sales pitch, citing the great tangled tech, a very detailed Reddit Page, new tests are announced. Tests? Yes, I said tests. More tests. Why? Well, things need fixing. But don’t worry, if you can download a large file, a new wallet, if the repository is not too busy, install it and follow basic instructions (not easily located) you will be just fine. Why might you need to reinstall a wallet? Because of the upgrades. They are making things better for you, of course. They are going to have the machines talk to each other and probably take over the world. Not really. It’s just to speed things up, like for paying automobile tolls in Germany. I guess they don’t have Sunpass.

So, you realized you have the Iota web wallet, during these tests. Well, you made a mistake. You need that new download. So you download, follow the instructions, thinking what a bunch of amateurs these Iota people are, all the while. You install a basic new wallet, pull over your funds from your old “seed” thingy, get all sorted out, get your new seed, stash it in a safe place, bitch to yourself how long it is, the lengths (literally) you will go to secure your crypto, feel good about it, how smart your are, then the fan gets hit hard — if you are a US citizen.

Bitfinex, the only major exchange offering Iota trading has decided that Americans are too risky. Sounds like baloney, but they allegedly don’t want the heat. You read the Reddits. Read between the lines. All is well they say. Others say get the hell out of there. Oh crap, you think. I just got my stupid wallet fixed and now this?

So, you think about it for a day. Watch as Iota continues up, tops a few times and starts to drift. You think, well, you can stick it out or do some more due diligence. So you waste more time. Listen to German “Iota” youth talk about how they are now reformed gamers. Oh great, roof top talks with guys who sold game mods on the sly. Okay, okay — it’s fine. Could be another Bill Gates. But not likely. I don’t think Bill was gamer as much as a thinker.

You reminisce about the old days then, last month, when you finally decided to buy some Iota. All that reading. All those profanity laced audio broadcasts you listened to from the Iota guy. That’s what I call him, the Iota guy. But I think he’s just a product of the times. Profanity is common now. It’s becoming meaningless. It has no impact, which is what I think they are shooting for. I can’t imagine people investing in Microsoft ™ if Bill Gates walked out on stage and let go a stream of mouth puke. But that’s how it flies at Iota. Rough and tough. (Baloney.) More like bravado to take your eye of the money ball. The ball they want you to give them.

So, here I was, Iota in my wallet. I got rid of it. A little at first. Jetted it to Bitfinex. Traded it. Withdrew other coins I know aren’t so sloppy. Waited. It worked. I did the rest, slowly. Breaking it up in small chunks until I got down to some weird divisions, minuscule amounts of Iota’s in my wallet. I left them. I wanted to reach in my computer then and squeeze the little wallet, give it some human-to-app love, but what the hell.

I was out of Iota. Well, except for some parts of them. Some atomic units I sent to my cell phone as a test, which I am just too lazy to mess with now. Then I go back on Reddit, see all the community members, the sheep, singing the Iota song. I wish the herd luck, but for now, I’m almost Iota-less and I’m not staring into that Zombie Moon waiting for the rockets. I’m thinking more of a bomb at this point, but I’ve been wrong before.

Anyway, I feel better about being Iota poor.

Sincerely,

Jack Shorebird

 

 

 

 

 

Clif High

 


Hello, crypto enthusiasts. Thanks for stopping by again. This is just a quickie for tonight. I mean it’s night where I am — in Florida (United States). You Europeans are dead asleep by now, but hey, you’ll open your emails in the morning. And you Asian folk, you’re getting off of work about now. I’m not sure about you Aussies. You guys (and gals) are what, eating dinner and watching the news about North Korea? Guam on your minds?

As usual, I’ve been scanning the net for the scoops. Watching the markets for the fizz and pop. And here’s the latest curiosity I’ve managed to dig up from the fintech ether. And mind you, the people (person) I may cite herein may not have the cleanest resumes, but damned if they don’t get your spaz juices flowing.

Bitcoin and Ethereum seem to be in the keeping modes right now. Meaning they are looking great. Clif High, and he’s a bit of a, how can I say this nicely — an unusual chap? But I’m not one for killing the messenger, even if he is a bit burnt, if you catch my drift.

And that’s why I’ve been chomping at the bit today and yesterday. Kind of mulling this whole thing over. Trying to align my belief in a gold backed (silver backed) monetary system with the alleged future facts (and ideas) Clif High is constantly bringing to the table.

But I can’t really do it justice and I do not work for Clif. Don’t know him from Adam, as it were. Yet the guy is able to explain, in words and ideas — in a few seconds — to sort of encapsulate what many of us might think. How bitcoin (cryptocurrency) may, within the next 10 to 20 years, undo thousands of years of stagnant and centralized money control. How this new world of crpyto can serve as a shot-in-the-arm for economies, for wealth, technological development and so on. That, according to Clif, America (the U.S.) split from Great Britain when about 3% of the people wanted it. That only about 1% or less of people, now want bitcoin or cryptocurrency. That, if this margin reaches 10%, the governments of the world, which are always behind the times, will be unable to stop it. That, the iron is heating up and you may be able to make some serious cash, if you invest soon. That is what Clif is implying, I believe.

These are very positive statements in a lot of ways, in my book.

But, I hope that Clif’s inexplicable descriptions, his references to the unusual and seemingly unproven, are not, in some ways, infecting his ability to maintain his rationality. As far as I can see, his “predictions” have raised eyebrows for several years now. But are his prognostications simply too general? Too crazy?

He talks about silver prices skyrocketing — for a time.

Gold’s just sort of okay, as far I can judge by Clif’s statements.

New tech that will create matter from energy is only a few years away. So why mine gold or silver in say, 15 years?

Potential limited nuclear wars are on the horizon.

But by and large, the outlook is very positive, in Clif’s assessments.

He didn’t talk about my current favorite crypto’s though: Neo and Iota.

Please — you be the judge. Give this guy a listen. Tell me that he does not, in some weird way, make you very positive about the future of our world.

Here’s his latest talk. It’s long — a YouTube interview.

The Interview.


 

 

Will Bitcoin Miners Initiate “SegWit” Early?

 


 

Bitcoin is not like the Titanic. The Titanic was on her maiden voyage when she struck that iceberg. Bitcoin has been sailing for years. It has been through rough seas before.

Thus far, the bitcoin community has not panicked about the upcoming SegWit updates. But preparations are being made by a few. It is possible that many in the community are wholly unaware of the SegWit icebergs now visible in the distance.

The 24 hour bitcoin outlook is currently positive, as of press time. The one hour trade display continues to blare “red” warnings on and off. Losses of up to three percent have been reported in the top ten most traded coins. You can see a current list of gains/losses here.

“…bitcoin is 33% off of its recent highs…”

Few cryptocurrencies are gaining value, if one has a seven-day measuring stick. Currently, bitcoin is 33% off of its highs posted in June of this year. If this was a stock, losing $1000 dollars per share, many would have initiated a sell order by now. Hint: cryptocurrencies are not stocks or bonds.

Bitcoin is once again flirting with $2200, which could serve to lull investors into a false sense of security. Ethereum’s volume also eclipsed bitcoin over the past 24 hours. This is happening more often now and yet bitcoin still has double the market cap at present. Iota and Veritaseum have also posted amazing gains in the last 24 hours.

But don’t let the “blips” fool you. Keep an eye out for the value spikes — the pump and dumps. And watch out for the sales pitches from all manner of used car salesmen. Make informed decisions. The SegWit icebergs are real. Either bitcoin slips by unscathed or it won’t.

Japanese bitcoin trade may halt.

The Japan Cryptocurrency Business Association  may recommend that its member exchanges stop processing all bitcoin transactions for as long as a week, as a result of the perceived crisis of faith. (See this Altcoin Today article for more details.) The concerns revolve around the legal ramifications if they take no action. Translated? If they lose money and customers come calling. The Japanese government could also change its mind about allowing their citizens to continue using bitcoin. They’ve already had experience with MtGox.

“…GDAX…taking similar actions.”

We also know that GDAX, a cryptocurrency exchange in the United States, is taking similar actions. Surely, for similar reasons. If SegWit results in US citizens losing money, you can bet the lawyers will start to circle. But the regulatory agencies will probably step in first.

This worse case scenario is always good to examine. But there are many other less problematic scenarios.

A consensus appears to be building. Get your bitcoins to safety and away from the exchanges.

“…ViaBTC…creating a separate token…”

ViaBTC, one of the largest mining operations in the world, with roughly 5% of the network, is taking steps to help ensure customer bitcoin holdings by creating a separate token based on BitcoinABC.

In a MarketWatch article out today, experts indicate that bitcoin has not yet bottomed. Other business gurus have concluded the opposite. The situation is fluid for sure.

$2888 bitcoin price?

On the positive, but unusual side, Clif High of Half Past Human has reported a probable bitcoin price of about $2888 in several months. You can check out his latest video here — if you are so inclined. In no way am I suggesting that he is accurate, I just like to give you all angles and some comedic relief.

Finally, it is rather ludicrous that some do not understand why merchants are not flocking to bitcoin. If you’ve been reading my blogs — well — I’m sure you have an idea. Heck, if you’ve been reading the bitcoin news in general, you should be feeling queasy — if you own any bitcoin.

Here is another optimistic viewpoint concerning the lack of merchant adoption:

“That is a very troubling development, even though there doesn’t appear to be a clear logic behind it.”

The above quote is from a NewsBTC article dated today. Do they get it? Bitcoin is not yet an easily adoptable technology. Debates about its core functions and who controls it, are major concerns.

How many other cryptocurrency exchanges are making preparations behind the scenes? And, are miners preparing to nip this thing in the bud? It appears to be true.

“…miners…signalling for SegWit early.”

CoinDesk has reported that miners are signalling for SegWit early. Here is the Countdown Clock they are referencing.

I’ll continue to keep you posted.


Image: Flickr

 

 

 

 

 

Bytecoin Blackout?


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Earlier today it was reported that Bytecoin.org mysteriously went offline. (You can read about it on BitcoinTalk.org here.) As of this writing the site is still down. Here’s what you might get:

An error occurred.

Sorry, the page you are looking for is currently unavailable. Please try again later.

If you are the system administrator of this resource then you should check the error log for details.

Faithfully yours, nginx.

Now this does not necessarily mean that 300 million dollars in BCN will evaporate, but it might end up that way. Especially if news comes out that Bytecoin.org was a complete and utter scam from jump street. Many have warned about this very thing.

And please know that Bytecoin’s Forum is still up. See: https://bytecointalk.org/index.php to verify. However, this is not a very active forum.

Are we about to experience another Alphabay fiasco? It does not appear to be that way — exactly. Unless the Bytecoin Team has raked in enough cash and has decided to abandon ship — which is not sinking. Maybe they are quitting on a high note? If so, the value should fall very soon. Why? Who will tend the software? How will we know when there is a software update? Are they switching to a full wallet based system — a more decentralized approach? If so, then where will newcomers obtain the application software? The wallet? The blockchain?

You can check here to see if the site is up yet: Bytecoin.org

The timing of this outage — this blackout — is curious. It coincides with a massive pump on the order of four million dollars (US). Although, Poloniex has not yet opened BCN (Bytecoin) for deposits/withdrawals — allegedly they are waiting for a solution from Bytecoin. Meanwhile, back at the ranch, the BCN trading at Poloniex is “off the chain.” What do they know that we don’t? Is this just another Polo-Pump?

If we back up a bit, some of us might recall that Bytecoin.org took their private forum offline recently and dumped a load of spam. This was shortly after I emailed them about the problem, but I do not know if they conducted the cleaning because of my email.

Strangely, just after my post yesterday about Pacific_Skyline, the main site went offline. Again, that’s probably just a coincidence, right? I mean, did I shame them? Maybe. I’ve been pretty tough on them lately about their odd writing — how it seems foreign-styled. Foreign in the sense that it’s not the American style of writing. Which is okay, but they might need to hire an editor to flesh out some of their extraneous verbiage. Long winded and flowery for sure. That is unusual, in my mind, for “math” types. Maybe it’s a French thing, since their website is allegedly based there. But I doubt it.

Now the Cryptonote.org website is still up. If you recall, Bytecoin is a Cryptonote coin. Run Scamadviser and you should find that this site is listed as “99%” and it “looks safe.” “Looks” is a weasel word. My cat “looks” safe, but he will eat your dog. Cryptonote.org might be located in the Netherlands, but it is hidden, according to the review. The site could just as easily be located in Panama or in the US. There has also been a lot of speculation that Cryptonote.org and Bytecoin.org are operated by the same crew. Should we then expect the CryptoNote.org site to shut down next? According to others, Bytecoin and CryptoNote parted ways some years ago and therefore Bytecoin.org going silent at this juncture, should not cause any troubles on CryptoNote.org.

Since many of the CryptoNote coins are related, I checked the following websites:

Aside from Pebblecoin and Quazarcoin, the above websites are easy to find and active. There are more CryptoNote coins, but they are essentially “dead” coins. In other words, many of the CryptoNote websites are alive and well. This makes me think that we are simply experiencing some kind of upgrade to the Bytecoin.org website. Again, if you will recall — at least for those of us who follow Bytecoin and the CryptoNote coins in general — we were advised about a forthcoming “colored coin” update by the Bytecoin Team about a month ago. We were not advised, however, that the website would blackout for a time. And, this new bit of news was a long time coming. About a year. And…it seemed repetitive. Are we being led by the nose? The long con?

There is no news on the CryptoNote.org website about Bytecoin.org’s current hiatus. There is no recent activity on Github, but I would not expect any if this is just a website upgrade. But I would expect this if the Teto-Team is upgrading BCN. You would think with all of the money flowing into BCN of late, that the TetoTeam can now focus on some serious development. Or maybe a seriously long vacation?

This of course brings up the 80 plus percent Bytecoin premine allegation. These days, with all of the ICO’s about, it does not strike us as odd, that any type of big premine is a big deal. It’s only about our acceptance of the coin — if it works as advertised. And it has always worked for me.

A recent piece on Reddit, if it can be believed, advised of an older exchange with the one of the previous Bytecoin Team members. What I got out of it was that there were about a 1000 or so early miners of BCN and the coin was really released in 2012, but the post did not go into the specifics — nothing about the fudged White Paper dates or the non-existence of a website back then.

If the Redditor in question stumbled upon a truth about Bytecoin, it would seem to imply several things. First, that over a thousand individuals have over 80% of the coins, which means it is not a small group of people and that is probably a good thing. Secondly, that the core Teto-Team may not know each other, personally. Now, take this as you may, but the most successful secret operatives work using the cell theory. They often do not know the organization they work for and only have one other contact — a vague one at that. In the new world of the internet, the developers of cryptocurrencies can work completely — or almost completely — anonymously. They do not need to identify their other team members at all.

Like I’ve mentioned before, this ability to work independently and anonymously, within the international financial environment, makes Bytecoin, if it survives its christening by fire, a force to be reckoned with. No other POW (Proof-of-Work) cryptocurrency on earth has ever accomplished such privacy and independence before; and had such success. (Please correct me if I am wrong.)

There has been much praise for the “coding” as well. Bytecoin is not a *bleep*coin, as it were. There have been recent issues with mining, however. This problem allowed someone or a group of them, to mine extra coins — beyond the perimeters set up in the code. It appears as if the Bytecoin Team has refused to undo these added coins and this stand has probably angered some. In the final analysis, however, when a cryptocurrency invalidates transactions after the fact, which would be required if a blockchain was rolled-back in order to reverse the creation of these extra coins, you end up with things like Ethereum Classic. Bytecoin avoided this rift. Full ahead, they said —  then they fixed the workings on the fly, as I understand it.

And please do not mention Monero. We know at least one player in that space. It is not unimaginable that other, less moral characters (our governments), know a lot more about the Monero developers. I’d say, in a world controlled by government money, that allowing one’s identity to leak out in this arena, is like to planning to go to prison in the future. Or, at the very least, sending a public invitation to the regulatory agencies the world over to plant electronic eavesdropping devices on your dog. (Hint: check their floppy ears.)

There is a side note here. Something that is causing a lot of concern on the internet. The Net Neutrality debate is raging. This could be one of the reasons that many websites have slowed over the past 48 hours. Of course those who support neutrality aren’t really supporting free and fair internet usage. They are supporting the institution of force. How so? If you are an internet company, under the idea of neutrality, you are required not to act in the interest of your own business. You may not charge other companies extra for use of your servers. You can’t offer special deals or market products of your choice by slowing down or limiting the access of competitors. You must allow every company connected to the internet — which really does not exist at all since it is simply computers connected to each other — free and unfettered access to your equipment. After all, under this alleged neutrality, the internet, which might use your equipment, your electrical power, your time — whether you agree to allow it or not — does not belong to you. It is some virtual thing, afloat in a sea of electricity — like the air we breathe. Nuts. It’s like Johnny Mnemonic all over again. “Information should be free!” Okay, but who will pay for it kids? Silence. Haven’t you heard? There ain’t no such thing as a free lunch, Jethro. Okay, the above is over-simplified, but ain’t that the gist of it?

Now we wait. The thing is, customers hate waiting. In fact, we find other, better suppliers — ones who are up to the job. (There, I just had to get that last Bytecoin dig in.)

Get off of your duff Bytecoin — if you’re still live.

Are you under attack?

Seriously, I hope that Bytecoin.org is “under reconstruction” as some have speculated. If true and if the new site comes up with some great new tech, well then, we might be in for a wild rocket ride.

I know…a lot of “ifs.”

Curiously, a few hours after posting this, the Bytecoin.org website once again showed itself. ScamAdviser indicates that the site is currently “94%” safe. There has been no official word from the Teto-Team as to why the site disappeared for over a day.

 


Image Source: Flickr

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bytecoin: Who is Joseph Lin aka Neocortex?


Who is Joseph Lin?

Many of us have stared at the Bytecoin Team Members list on Bytecoin.org and wondered just who they were — or more precisely, who they are. Are they still around? Are they layered in pseudonyms to protect their identities? If so, why?

There are so many ways to search the internet that one can get lost in the noise of it. Sometimes it’s better to be obvious. In other words, you can ask the question of any number of search engines (Google, Mozilla FireFox, DuckDuckgo, or even TOR) and get a thousand answers, all speculation; or you can click around.

So click around. Try the “News” heading, instead of the “All” setting.

For example, you can begin with this article on Bytecoin.org:

The Proof-of-Work in Cryptocurencies: Brief Histroy. Part 2.”

The guest author is Ray Patterson, but don’t read the article. That’s not what I’m on about. Instead search for “Ray Patterson” and “Bytecoin” in quotes.

A little ways down in your search results you should see another article on Coin Telegraph.  It’s dated July 8, 2015. Follow this link:

A Proof of Work Evolution.”

Did you see the name associated with the article? Joseph Lin?

There it is, but is it? Is Joseph Lin really Neocortex of Bytecoin fame? Is he or was he really the lead programmer of Bytecoin. The fortepiano player who favors the works of composer Johann Bach. And who really cares if he plays with his organ?

If we can trust the name, Lin seems to be of Taiwanese descent, but he could just as easily be from China or any number of Asian countries. So we are no closer here. It’s like the name Smith or Jones.

We can explore Lin’s alleged Alma Mater: University of California, Berkeley. That’s a ride. Lin is a common name. Good luck.

The same goes for attempting to search Lin’s college or alleged degrees. There are so many possibilities.

Here are some curious tidbits, however.

July 9, 2015. Joseph Lin publishes…

Miners Lost Over $50,000 from the Bitcoin Hardfork Last Weekend.”

Was he trying to expose the weaknesses of Bitcoin then? Sure.

July 16, 2015. Joseph Lin pops ups again. This time commenting about DigitalNote in the this article:

Dissidents turn to bitcoin-like cryptocurrency to communicate free from state surveillance.”

Lin gives us some useful information. It is also curious that he cares about dissidents. This makes me think he is Chinese or maybe a Hong Konger. He’s chomping under the “bit” of oppression.

October 7, 2015. Here is another tantalizing clue:

“‘Neucoin Will Have More Consumers Using It Than Bitcoin within One Year’ – Founder.

Well, that didn’t happen, but again we find Joseph Lin lurking about. He apparently asked a question about Neucoin, but it went unanswered.

Then nothing. At least nothing obvious. Did something happen on October 7, 2015? Why did he drop from view?

My point here? There are so many bloggers out there who tell us that there are few if any leads to the mysterious Bytecoin Team Members. Here is one: Joseph Lin.

Can we track him or is this just another dead end?

How about you Joseph Lin aka Neocortex, do you care to respond?


 

If you liked this article and want more of the same, consider sending any amount of Bytecoin (BCN) to:

22WuwNdkFM1Xqg3etSVYtKcwhyLoQTXZ37EHVk4dJhtZSx3Csh5uoQbQVH78oswEbQH1Uanxe8CTW9qw4KxcSftTFubnfL8

Thanks.

 

 

 

 

 

Bytecoin Speculation

 

bytecoin_logo_b_white_circle_large - Copy

Why is it that the Bytecoin Team seems aloof, almost disinterested in their own potential success? It does not appear that they are abandoning ship, based upon recent Github activities. Someone is updating.

And someone is adding news and blogs to the official Bytecoin.org website after many months.

Still, why the relative quiet, other than within their own forum?  That was, until its recent disappearance and reappearance.

After filling up with advertisements, and after yours truly advised them of such via their website, the Bytecoin Forum seemed to have taken a hiatus. Recently sometime around June 7, 2017, it was back up.

Now I understand the need for anonymity in today’s world. But such anonymity is a double-edged sword. Having cryptocurrency developers retain their privacy certainly keeps them safe from the overzealous government-banksters. (And yes, I’m sure there are good bankers out there — working in a bad environment.)

On the other hand, the Bytecoin Team must know that we the users get a bit antsy when we cannot “read the news” more often. Even if the news is slanted. Why? Because we can read between the lines.

In fact, Bytecoin.org, something seems amiss now that you are talking again. Has your “voice” changed?

Recently — May 17, 2017 — Bytecoin.org added a new blog entry. As usual, their blog was professional and polished or was it? Actually two entries were made. The blog and on May 19, 2017, a news piece. Both were clear, but rather brief. I’ll focus on the May 17th blog entry for now. It has a few oddities, if you read it closely.

 

First:

 

“Cryptocurrency market has been developing drastically, bringing more and more innovations to explore.”

 

That’s the first sentence of the blog. Who starts a sentence like that? Shouldn’t there be a “The” to start that sentence? Okay, no biggie. Let’s move on.

The blog was titled “Untraceable Tokens.” It implied that the cryptocurrency space has been innovating. That there is more to explore. Certainly this is true. Since Bytecoin came along, Monero was born and Bitcoin, as always is experiencing growing pains. And a thousand other cryptocurrencies have been born and have since faded in the no-trade zone.

 

A second oddity in the blog:

 

“…top ten token market capitalization value overgrowing $1.4 billion.”

 

Overgrowing? How about “exceeding” $1.4 billion. Again, this could be a “country” thing.

 

A third issue, that may just be me…

 

“…we promise to give you full detail in the upcoming posts.”

 

Full “detail?” Do they mean full “details?”

Say that with a Russian accent: “Comrade, sit in chair, give full detail in upcoming posts. Bytecoin is not Russian, this you must tell world. And KGB not overgrowing. It dead.”

 

A fourth issue:

 

“Further on we will keep you informed about the development process to make sure you do not miss the opportunity to be in the first line to emit your own untraceable Bytecoin based token.”

 

Is it just me again? “Further on?” Do they mean “from now on?”

And how about “the first in line” part? Do they mean “to be the first in line?”

I hear Russian accent, Comrade. No?

 

In any event, they state that Bytecoin has:

 

“…broken ground on developing a wallet-integrated solution that would allow anyone to create their own Bytecoin based token”

 

I mean, don’t we have enough tokens?

 

Or is this a bit of good news. An untraceable token to represent “assets” on the Bytecoin blockchain. Like Ethereum, in some respects — but more private and secure I gather. The fact that this token system will be wallet integrated is also curious.

Integrated into an easy-to-use wallet, like the one we have now or like the Ethereum system? With Ethereum there is a learning curve. I hope that Bytecoin’s innovations will be more user-friendly, however. Not a bloated giant.

The blog entry also teases us with another upcoming innovation — a new “feature.” We can only speculate here. It could be anything.

 

The last bit of information in the blog entry is the notification that we will be provided more information at some future date, so we can be the first to try their new token based system. Again, it is worded oddly to me.

 

Most of us may not need tokens, if we already have Bytecoin. Some, however, could use a token for creating in-house cryptocurrencies that are more secure and private than Bitcoin. The start-up costs might be minimal, if the backbone (Bytecoin) is already there. Also, more users would likely strengthen the backbone. As this occurs — if it occurs — Bytecoin would become more valuable. It is also possible that the tokens themselves could become more valuable than Bytecoin itself.

On the other “dirty” hand, adding tokens to the system might strain it, if the Bytecoin devs are attempting to create mammoth system. I hope they choose to make things modular, in this sense. So any bad “parts” can be replaced or rejected by users voluntarily.

 

We are teased further with this…

 

“Commencing countdown till the global ICO market revolution.”

 

Personally, I’d like to see a clock ticking down, but I get the picture.

 

Of course, ICO means “Initial Coin Offering,” but what coin or coins? Our own tokens we generate on top of the Bytecoin blockchain? Or their new tokens?

And what market? Token market(s)? Like all those tokens being added on top of the Ethereum Blockchain? Are these the “markets?” Are they talking about another market altogether?

When you think about that for a minute you have to wonder what type of organization would use a private, secure and untraceable token. Not banks. They must comply with regulations. Not investment houses, for the same reasons.

Individuals could use tokens they create, however. And yes, the bad guys too.

Suppose you live in China, for example. You’ve been trying to get your money out of the country for years, but can’t. All of your compatriots don’t trust most cryptocurrencies. They are traceable — much too public. Many of your friends know about Bytecoin, but they trust you, not some unknown system that has been ruthlessly attacked by bloggers and hacker alike. You then decide to create a token on the Bytecoin Blockchain that represents an asset. It could be gold, silver or some other property.

What is the end result of a token that cannot be traced to a sender or receiver? Monetary freedom? Gox in a box?

Don’t forget the flip-side of Bytecoin, however. Nobody is watching the fort. If your newly emitted tokens evaporate into thin air, oh well. At least with the public coins — like Ripple, Stellar Lumens or even Ethereum, you can contact a live human.

With Bytecoin? You can look at nice Bytecoin Team Memes. Hello “PACIFIC_SKYLINE,” do you really exist? How’s the water? Answer? Silence.

I do detect a note of odd grammar in this latest blog. It is as if the poster does not quite have a complete grasp of the language or is writing in a type of shortcut method. It could also be that the writer is not American — perhaps English is a second language. (I am American, but at least my grammar errors are obvious.)

And I am not an English teacher, but I argue with them regularly. They often tell me about my spelling errors on these blogs. But spelling is one thing and grammar is another. We can “hear” the subtle differences.

More ominously, maybe Bytecoin has been bought-out and the new owners are attempting to keep this fact quiet, Da?

Finally, maybe all the original “Team” is present. If that is so, please clean up your latest blog.

And talk to us.