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Will Cryptocurrency become Over-regulated in 2018?

Will Cryptocurrency become Over-regulated in 2018?

Dear Cryptocurrency Investors…and those concerned about the future of regulation,

We need to think about what they will do next. Before the dominoes begin to fall. Currently, cryptocurrency appears to be reacting.

It’s time to be proactive or at least think ahead.

What’s the bad thing about ICO’s being regulated?

The next bend in the road.

It’s the first good way in. A way for governments to begin their crawl into the cryptosphere using the alleged reason that they want to protect you – to save you money. Because, you know – if they leave it up to you – you’ll screw it up and some fools will get ripped off.

A Broad Stroke…

So, instead of going after the thieves, the regulators use a broad brush. They paint everyone red. It’s then your job, as a cryptocurrency developer, to prove your innocence. You are automatically guilty from the start. Hey, it’s the way of the money-changers.

That’s how regulations work. Not laws, which help to convict the bad guys, but regulations to tell the good guys how they will run their businesses. From how many toilets a grocery store must have to the slope of the wheel chair ramps at Wally World.

“…regulations…”

Can you imagine the crypto-regulations? How many coins a crypto might have. How much they may charge. Where they can sell. How they will register and identify all users. How the company must be formed. What records it must keep.

I could go on.

The point? Innovation would suffer. Coins, good and bad, would die. The big boys on the block would file all the necessary paper work and press on, only to become embroiled in more legal issues. Bitcoin would need to register. The one saving grace – that bitcoin is not a company or a corporation – would be tossed in the crapper.

You’d have the same choice as before. Which company should I invest in? Which controlled, fiat dollar financed, regulatory burdened, bankster run, non-private new-crypto should I choose?

How about none of the above, if crypto gets ramrodded?

Now, you might say that ICO’s, which in the early days of purist-crypto (that never really existed), are no different than premining. And I’d have to agree. But if you accept an ICO, then no harm no foul and…let the best seed money bear fruit. Not much different than initial stock offerings that go belly up or soar.

No longer. The regulators, in their quest to ensure the permanence of centralized government monetary systems have no choice but to secure the current systems via tight controls of the supply of money; and that means anything that is even remotely connected to money. And that means…you and me.

Cryptocurrency is more closely related to stocks than money, some will argue, but make no mistake, the ICO warning is a shot over the bow, again.

So, what is next, logically?

Ignoring for the moment, steps being taken by various governments to fold crypto-regulation into the murky half-laws dealing with KYC and money laundering issues, how will the government gangs launch their next foray?

Here’s an idea.

When the laws pass that will require all Americans, Europeans, Asians etc., to report their crypto-holdings, that will simply be the opening bell. The “hey, we’ve just legitimized your bubble money and now you must let us ruin it” moment.

Next, after regulating who may or may not create a cryptocurrency, via an ICO, they (our blessed regulators who invent and create nothing) will, in the most obvious of blunders, conclude that anyone seeking to initiate a blockchain based crypto or similar, must first seek approval from a bureaucrat, who is necessarily, holding keys to the jail cells. It will be the Pre-ICO rules. Comply or bye-bye. Good guys must be throttled with numerous and confusing righteous regulations, above and beyond the laws, to be sure.

Now that is not all.

How else, given their penchant for protecting their conscriptual citizenry, will our illustrious innovators of graft continue to serve our interests?

“…retroactive…”

I say they will go full retroactive. After all, it’s the best way to collect taxes. Make them guilty, yesterday.

Henceforth, all cryptos having existed prior to now, and which are not currently in compliance with the laws heretofore dictated, must comply immediately. All persons having control or interest in the core development of any and all cryptocurrencies, must come forward to [fill in the blank] and file all appropriate applications, submit all required fees, undergo a background check, and more or less, be told exactly how said currencies will be sold, dispensed or used.

The above, is of course nonsense or is it?

Keep an eye out.

Just wait for it. Maybe in a year?

I’d be nervous if I was a “dev.”

 

Sincerely,

 

Jack Shorebird

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Bitcoin: Deletion by Executive Order?

Bitcoin: Deletion by Executive Order?

Dear Cryptocurrency Investors,

Let’s play a “worst case scenario” game. Why? Because it’s always good to play the “what if” game. It helps you prepare.

You see a lot of hints out there and worries. But I wanted a bit more. I wanted you to taste it, if even fictionally. Why?

Because this has happened before. I know people who lived through it. People who had to turn in their gold to the government or face criminal prosecution.

But a little background first.

Cryptocurrency is now being accused of outshining gold. It’s little wonder that in the United States bitcoin is effectively, 10 times the price of gold.

Think on that for a moment. Software – a ledger service – is now more valuable than a physical commodity.

What’s more, cryptocurrency cannot be as easily regulated as gold or silver. It’s a governmental conundrum.

In 1933, President Franklin D. Roosevelt (FDR) signed Executive Order 6102. It essentially confiscated gold from law abiding citizens because of an emergency.

The emergency? It’s debatable, but many point to one thing: to bailout the Federal Reserve. At the time, many foreign countries were cashing in dollars for American gold and well, the government was running low.

Gold prices back then were set by government at $20.67 an ounce. About a year later, the official rate of gold was raised to $35 per ounce. What that meant was that the US Dollar lost approximately 40% of its value in a year. Inflation was gifted by Uncle Sam. It may have also slowed the gold drain, since by then, foreigners had to use more fiat currency to buy the same amount of gold.

This is all history. How US citizens were ripped-off by their government. No wonder, that even today, people are nervous about their gold. But maybe they shouldn’t worry so much now.

Gold has been out-shined. The days of price manipulation by governments, is over.

Bitcoin is now the up and coming king of currencies. Perhaps it is better to say that cryptocurrency is king. Why?

Because we do not know if some new altcoin will win the day. Ethereum, IOTA, Litecoin or Monero – or some innovative altcoin may soon become the new digital gold. But there is no doubt that the digital gold rush is on.

Governments are paying much closer attention.

They see that their fiat currency is under threat by software that not only substitutes for fiat dollars, but does all sorts of other neat things too. They avoid capital controls, zip around the world in seconds, skirt banks and taxes – and hide in plain sight. Best of all, they can’t be confiscated, without permission – or so we hope. Governments have a difficult time tracking them.

The idea that blockchains cannot be cracked by quantum computers might not wash. If the government agencies utilize quantum computers to confiscate a single cryptocurrency transaction, this would no doubt have a chilling effect upon the entire cryptosphere.

Would people then stop transacting in crypto, knowing that any transaction could be redirected to a government wallet? Would that not halt crypto in its tracks? Make it worthless?

Could our governments conduct a 51% attack? A concerted effort to destroy specific crypto targets? These cryptocurrency websites often suffer such attacks and other issues.

North Korea attacks bitcoin regularly, via the exchanges. It appears that they are trying to steal cryptocurrency, however, and not destroy the targets themselves. They are a fiscally challenged despotic regime, after all.

Denial-of-service attacks recently hit the cryptocurrency exchanges Bitfinex and Bittrex.

Bitfinex shies away from American customers due to the onerous reporting regulations and the costs associated with them.

Bittrex is suspiciously locking Legacy accounts and asking for upgraded identity information from its customers. They telegraphed (reported) this process before they proceeded, but reduced customer withdrawal amounts. Shortly thereafter the total lockdown began. They have sent out emails to apologize.

One would expect a big outflow of funds when and if Bittrex releases the locks. Unless Bittrex customers have been Goxxed.

Crypto-jacking is on the rise. Are you mining crypto for others as you surf the web? You would hope not.

ICO’s may soon lose their luster. Initial Coin Offerings can be used to easily raise money, but will the developers make good on their promises? Recent US investigations might be one nail in that coffin.

And to top it all off, it appears that bitcoin has some serious problems ahead. Routing attacks are a concern. Apparently, most of bitcoin’s transactions flow through just three ISP’s. If true, how difficult would it be to slow the nodes? To make everyone lose the faith?

“…the biggest threat…”

In all this mess, many of us are ignoring the biggest threat of all, however: The Great Confiscators. The governments.

If FDR could sign an Executive Order to take all the gold from Americans, how difficult would it be for a sitting president to do the same – to steal the crypto?

If Congress, in the US, cannot agree on a bill to make Americans report their crypto-holdings, would it not be easier to whip out the presidential pen and in a matter of hours, criminalize bitcoin possession?

And that’s my thrust here. I wanted to imagine just what such an order would look like. So I looked up FDR’s great theft and perused a couple of The Donald’s recent Executive Orders and came up with this:


Presidential Executive Order Combating Terrorism, Money Laundering, Illicit Drugs and Cryptocurrency Pyramid Schemes

By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, including the National Emergencies Act (50 U.S.C. 1601 et seq.), and in furtherance of the objectives of Proclamation 7463 of September 14, 2001 (Declaration of National Emergency by Reason of Certain Terrorist Attacks), which declared a national emergency by reason of the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, in New York and Pennsylvania and against the Pentagon, and the continuing and immediate threat of further attacks on the United States, and in order to provide the Secretary of Defense additional authority to manage personnel requirements in a manner consistent with the authorization provided in Executive Order 13223 of September 14, 2001 (Ordering the Ready Reserve of the Armed Forces to Active Duty and Delegating Certain Authorities to the Secretary of Defense and the Secretary of Transportation), and in order to clarify SEC. 13. Prepaid access devices, digital currencies, or other similar instruments, (a) In general. —Section 5312(a) of title 31, United States Code, it is hereby ordered as follows:

Section 1. For the purposes of this regulation, the term “hoarding” means the withdrawal and withholding cryptocurrency, cryptocurrency contracts, prepaid access devices, and digital currency, from the recognized and customary channels of trade, be they held at a digital exchanger or tumbler of digital currency or anywhere and in any form not yet known to exist. The term “person” means any individual, partnership, association or corporation.

Section 2. All persons are hereby required to deliver or transfer on or before January 1, 2018, to a Federal Reserve Bank or a branch or agency thereof or to any member bank of the Federal Reserve System all cryptocurrency holdings, cryptocurrency passwords and password seed phrases, to include hardware, software, and paper wallets, now owned or controlled by them or coming into their ownership on or before December 6, 2017, except the following:

(a) Such amount of cryptocurrency as may be required for pre-approved legitimate and customary use within and under the direct control of the regulated banking and financial industry or those government regulated companies that serve said industries, including any cryptocurrency mined/minted therein.

(b) Cryptocurrency and cryptocurrency certificates in an amount not exceeding in the aggregate of .00000001 BTC, belonging to any one person; and cryptocurrency having a recognized special value to bankers as rare and unusual altcoins.

(c) Cryptocurrency and mining, minting, or other methods of network security, earmarked or held in trust for a recognized foreign Government or foreign central bank or the Bank for International Settlements.

(d) Cryptocurrency and any derivatives thereof, licensed for other proper transactions (not involving hoarding) including cryptocurrency and said derivatives, imported for reexport or held pending action on applications for export licenses.

Section 3. Until otherwise ordered, any person becoming the owner or controller of any cryptocurrency, cryptocurrency passwords or password seed phrases, to include hardware, software, and paper wallets after December 6, 2017, shall, within three days after receipt thereof, deliver the same in the manner prescribed in Section 2; unless such cryptocurrencies are held for any of the purposes specified in paragraphs (a), (b), or (c) of Section 2; or unless such cryptocurrencies are held for purposes specified in paragraph (d) of Section 2 and the person holding it is, with respect to such cryptocurrency, a licensee or applicant for license pending action thereon.

Section 4. Upon receipt of cryptocurrency delivered to it in accordance with Sections 2 or 3, the Federal Reserve Bank or member bank will note therefor an equivalent amount of any other form of legal tender at the official rate of one US cent per one BTC or equivalent in any other altcoin.

Section 5. Member banks shall deliver all cryptocurrency owned or received by them (other than as exempted under the provisions of Section 2) to the Federal Reserve Banks of their respective districts and receive credit or payment therefor, at the going market rate, prior to the issuance of this order.

Section 6. The Secretary of the Treasury, out of the sum made available to the President, will in all proper cases pay the reasonable costs of transportation or transfer of cryptocurrency delivered to a member bank or Federal Reserve Bank in accordance with Section 2, 3, or 5 hereof, including the cost of insurance, protection, and such other incidental costs as may be necessary, upon production of satisfactory evidence of such costs. Voucher forms for this purpose may be procured from Federal Reserve Banks.

Section 7. In cases where the delivery of cryptocurrency by the owners thereof within the time set forth above will involve extraordinary hardship or difficulty, the Secretary of the Treasury may, in his discretion, extend the time within which such delivery must be made. Applications for such extensions must be made in writing under oath, addressed to the Secretary of the Treasury and filed with a Federal Reserve Bank. Each application must state the date to which the extension is desired, the amount and location of the cryptocurrency in respect of which such application is made and the facts showing extension to be necessary to avoid extraordinary hardship or difficulty.

Section 8. The Secretary of the Treasury is hereby authorized and empowered to issue such further regulations as he may deem necessary to carry out the purposes of this order and to issue licenses thereunder, through such officers or agencies as he may designate, including licenses permitting the Federal Reserve Banks and member banks of the Federal Reserve System, in return for an equivalent amount of other coin, currency or credit, to deliver, earmark or hold in trust cryptocurrency to or for persons showing the need for the same for any of the purposes specified in paragraphs (a), (c) and (d) of Section 2 of these regulations.

Section 9. Upon collection of the cryptocurrencies in question, the Secretary of the Treasury is hereby ordered to delete, by any feasible method, as verified by Federal Reserve Banks and companies on retainer for said purposes, the cryptocurrencies in their possession by not later that February 1, 2018.

Section 10. Whoever willfully violates any provision of this Executive Order or of these regulations or of any rule, regulation or license issued thereunder may be fined not more than $1,000,000, or, if a natural person, may be imprisoned for not more than twenty-five years, or both; and any officer, director, or agent of any corporation who knowingly participates in any such violation may be punished by a like fine, imprisonment, or both.

This order and these regulations may be modified or revoked at any time.

THE PRESIDENT

THE WHITE HOUSE?

December 6, 2017…


Do not think for a moment that such an order is impossible today.

Be ready.

Note: Please feel free to copy my fictional executive order and distribute. Wake up some crypto-heads.

 

Sincerely,

 

Jack Shorebird

 

P.S. Do you really think that all Americans – the true patriots – gave up their gold in 1933?

 

“Mining” Your Visitors?

“Mining” Your Visitors?

Dear Cryptocurrency Enthusiasts:

Don’t ask don’t tell.

Words to live by? Not.

Don’t muck with your website visitors. Ask first.

Aside from all the other goings-on, we now have to concern ourselves with sneaky people. Those who will inject code in their webpages to mine your CPU, basically.

Watch out for those pop-unders.

There is so much information out there, that my two bits aren’t worth the bother. In fact, you can now get hopelessly lost in the crypto-sphere. And have fun at the same time. And make money.

But the webpage miners are being thwarted at every turn.

Is this really a cryptocurrency phenomenon at all? Or is it a social one? Geared toward the criminal element?

Not necessarily and I’ll get to that in a moment.

The webpage mining tech was attracting the users. Even me. I figured I could ask for people to mine a bit of crypto as they read my blog. A bit of extra income.

But many webpage miners didn’t ask you. They got greedy. And they fouled the water for everyone else — for now.

So, can you really make money by grabbing everyone’s CPU power? It seems that the effort has now been largely blocked. So, the short answer is no.

At first, the idea seemed to hold some promise. Help us niche bloggers earn a few extra bucks, but then the dream evaporated, if it ever was more than a dream in the first place.

Many of us have heard about CoinHive and its alleged shady reputation. How you could use their codes on your website and mine cryptocurrency (Monero XMR) by using the CPU power of website visitors. You could even do it without advising your website visitors, which was unethical, to say the least.

The fact that Coinhive did not originally design their software to inform the website visitors that your CPU was being used without your permission, but left it up to the software users to do this, speaks volumes. And even if Coinhive had coded their app to inform website visitors, any good hacker could then strip away those warnings and mine in secret anyway.

If you check, Coinhive’s reputation on Scamadviser you will see that they have a high rating. Really? I say they are going to sink, if they don’t re-gear posthaste.

I experimented with CoinHive for a bit, several months back — on other websites — not here. I let everyone know up front what I was doing.

It was kind of fun, but also kind of a waste of time. I think I earned about 25 cents, but I can’t withdraw that tiny amount, so Coinhive will end up with it, I’m sure.

I think I actually mined most of my own crypto anyway. Every time you logged onto Coinhive’s site, they mine your CPU, essentially.

I experimented two ways on my webpages.

First, I copied the code CoinHive had and pasted it on one of my old Blogspot Blogs (not on this website) that didn’t get any traffic, because like a dummy, I renamed it and screwed up my Google Adsense account – which is another joke.

But the CoinHive miner did work – then. The scripts ran.

Here was my code for embedding all the fun:

Coinhive Sc - Copy

I just copy and pasted. Then I advised everyone what I was doing.

Here’s what pops up (if it works):


miner - Copy


And don’t be fooled, even this demo (above) on the CoinHive website, sucks down CPU power like mad. It’s a live demo! No free lunch.

Well, the above code was improved by CoinHive to alert you that the mining was taking place. (A bit late guys.)

In any event, most ISP’s, Google etc., block the scripts from running. And yes, you can get fancy and try to code workarounds – if you really want to get blacklisted (unless you’re working over TOR or a VPN).

You are certainly welcome to copy my code and try it. Adblock should eat you alive, however. And you may suffer the blacklist. What do you expect from ISP’s these days?

The second method I used from CoinHive was called the “shortlink.” It was kinda neat. A proof-of-work captcha that, in theory (if I was a webmaster and not a simpleton blogger) I could install as a “key” to allow you to read my fine works.

Once activated, the shortlink mined Monero for a moment (on a computer – not a cell phone) then redirected you to a website of my choosing. (I redirected everyone back to my blog.)

Here’s my shortlink:


cnhv.co/ol2


Here’s what it does (maybe):


Coinhive Cap - Copy


However, your Adblockers etc., should kill it.

There are other script miners out there as well.

There’s Popcoin, Crypto-Loot (kind of shady), and others. But they don’t necessarily have good reputations.

There is one website miner out there, however, that does have promise — but it’s also blocked. It looks to be a legitimate crypto in this space.

JseCoin (my affiliate link) does not seem to fall into the bad-boy crowd. But coming on the heels of CoinHive and clan, I wonder if they can pull it off – after their ICO.

JseCoin also has a script miner. Here’s mine:


!function(){var e=document,t=e.createElement(“script”),s=e.getElementsByTagName(“script”)[0];t.type=”text/javascript”,t.async=t.defer=!0,t.src=”https://load.jsecoin.com/load/31935/thecryptopapers.com/optionalSubID/0/”,s.parentNode.insertBefore(t,s)}();


JseCoin is nice enough to have the code all ready, but…as with CoinHive’s script, Adblock eats it up. It will not (usually) work. But I did confirm that the script is functional.

Jsecoin looks like this, when it runs, if it runs:


Jsecoin wsm - Copy


JseCoin does not offer shortlinks, presently, but may offer ads for publishers in the near future.

As for JseCoin itself? I have no idea, but the promise is intriguing. You can also, just like in the old days (2009), mine with your CPU online; and I understand that JseCoin is ASIC resistant as well.

But here’s the thing. All the bad press about the big-bad honcho’s stealing your CPU power (and some did) has not yet caught up with the idea of paying with crypto, hot off the press.

If this crypto-world keeps on going, this kind of thing might become routine. And the naysayers – those who say website mining is theft — might need to get with the program and stop whining for blog hits (like me).

If you are aware of it and agree to pay for some service or visit a website, knowing in advance, that you are financing the site with magic internet money, burned from your CPU, no nitwit can censor your right to do it. And that goes double for the ISP’s and giant internet media farms (given special privileges by governments to hold large landmasses of humans nearly hostage to crappy service).

Oh, I’m not on about Net Neutrality. That’s a red herring, IMO. The internet does not need more regulation, it needs less. More providers should be allowed on the landmasses. Right now, it’s pay to play. As in, fork over bribes to Pauli Politician – to get exclusive territories. That’s just wrong.

Do you really think governments don’t just love it when website/webpage miners are trashed? Sure, they do. It would be the second-to-the-last-straw if we could pay for stuff with CPU power as we surfed the web.

Hey, maybe that’s what JseCoin is seeing… A new world of tiny CPU cryptos and they want to be first in.

The thing is, the tech isn’t right yet. I mean the idea of a webpage miner is a start, but not the whole kitty litter box. We need some more user-friendliness. Maybe some profit-sharing.

There are so many ways to do this. We could all download a small miner to pay for browsing. Use a tiny bit of our CPU for incidentals. One news story from the Wall Street Journal. A free ebook for a few minutes of your CPU.

Websites that benefited could issue prizes, coupons, gasoline credits.

The marketing ideas are endless.

For now, however, the ISP’s etc., are attempting to halt this innovation at the request of the old guard. Webpage mining tech is yet another nail in the FED’s printing-press monopoly. And they are already miffed about bitcoin.

 

 

Sincerely,

 

Jack Shorebird.


 

Cryptocurrency: “…and Bitcoin Must Burn!”

Cryptocurrency: “…and Bitcoin Must Burn!”

Dear Crypto-fans,

The crypto-fake-fintech-news continues, but the tide is turning in some few lands. Slovenia maybe. Singapore, possibly. Nigeria? Yes. But I won’t be emigrating.

Google trends are showing an upswing of late.

But the battle against cryptocurrency is also gaining momentum. The reaction is fomenting. Like Cato the Elder’s call for Carthage to burn, so too are the princes of the day signaling their intent, through their mouthpieces on retainer, that non-princely crypto, must also be destroyed.

The most recent pretext to dump bitcoin and cryptocurrency, besides bubble fears, is that fiat currency is “backed” by the government or the Central Bank. That such a thing as cryptocurrency, which does not enjoy the toxic fruits of the government fiat monopoly, is intolerable and hopeless.

But this assertion is ominous, not glorious. Whether you believe Clif High, that Bitcoin will far outpace the value of gold or you want to take to the shadows with your secret Bytecoin, the princes are on the march. They care not if you chose Cardano (ADA), but might let up, if you wade into Ripple (XRP).

And we cannot reach into our television sets, our computer monitors, our tablets or cell phones, and shake these intellectual Lilliputians by the shoulders and yell, “Hey, Brainiacs, fiat money is also NOT backed – except by a gun.”

“How dare you think that, you finite fleshpots.”

That’s how they respond, in my translation. Shake their ponytails, peer side-long down red veined noses, lick their finely wine-soaked lips, point to the proper ends of their overcooked eggs, with bejeweled digits, and leer at us subjugated subjects – with the aplomb of the imagined royal birthright.

Two such peers of servitude deserve mention.

“Alan Greenspan…Jamie Dimon…”

Alan Greenspan? A former gold bug, now completely in tune with the Fed or is that the vampiric feeding of inflated monetary dogma?

Jamie Dimon? A bankster in the Morgan mold or is he a dollar-defender, through hell and devalue?

Here are a few more bitcoin bashers to peruse.

Deep thinkers of the bygone epoch, where it is said that monetary conscription is better than gold-backs. Where the song of sound money, as sublime and powerful as it is, cannot meet the rejoinder – the princely power of the purse, under guard.

What do these bashers of bitcoin really mean when they say that cryptocurrency is not “backed” by Johnny Law? They mean, dear readers, that the prince is not in charge of the peoples’ currency, i.e., cryptocurrency.

And that is the crux of it. THE PRINCE HAS NO CONTROL. Paupers must mind their prince.

The prince’s fiat money is “backed” by his soldiers. You must use it – or else.

Think on that, each time you pull that fiat from your wallet with that picture of the current or past princes. This currency is “backed” by the point of a gun, the threat of jail if you refuse to use it, or large fines if you dare to abuse it. It is called forced compliance.

The Federal Reserve Note, is your contract with the prince. Do no fail to abide by the terms.

Has not humankind outgrown such princely designs?

The religion of money…

Most currency, that plastic card, paper or digital noise stored at your bank or under that rock in your yard, is worthless-worth. It is backed by nothing and the power to “make it work.” A promise to pay zero and from that zero, substance. The religion of money, if you will. To make nothing buy something. Just believe, sayeth the Prince of Fiat.

Every school child should know this. Government fiat is “myth money.” Fantasy cash, you are compelled to use.

The soldier “backs” your princely fiat these days. Except, to him, you are the enemy. Harsh words, but relevant when comparisons must be made with cryptocurrency.

Fiat crypto, by comparison, is an all-volunteer army. In this scenario of sin, the prince of fiat is dead.

And about the noble metals. There are no gold bars at the bank – in most cases. Even the Swiss have denuded their banks of metal. But the Swiss people, being a lot more intelligent than their host of princes, have stored gold in private vaults – not banks. Unfortunately, the princes are aware of the locations of such vaults.

But who owns that gold? You think American and Japanese billionaires don’t have a dog in that fight? Sure, they do. Will a Swiss Army man care to back your Swiss stored gold, if his prince reclaims the bars, for the good of Switzerland?

And private vaults abound these days. Do you wonder why? And are these vaults safe from the princes’ soldiers?

…myth money…

Cryptocurrency is also a myth money, a fiat currency, but it is different too. The prince does not own the cryptocurrency fiat money machine. The people own crypto. It is a detached system of fiat currency that circumvents capital controls, i.e., the Prince’s Rules of Trade. And there are dozens of competing blockchain alternatives, not simply one princely fiat system.

The prince is fuming about this. How dare his subjects create their own fiat currency. Don’t they know that fiat money is backed by nothing – not even the princes’ soldiers?

You might wonder how a cryptocurrency system can invade and dislodge, peaceably, the Prince’s Bank and essentially rob him of his ability to conduct business. You might also wonder what the prince is going to do when his fiat currency begins to devalue so rapidly that he can no longer pay his castle employees the proper level of wages.

He will need to pay his soldiers some how and maintain his dominance.

Will the prince seek to control all the cryptocurrencies on earth? No, he does not have that power.

Could our Prince enlist the help of other princes abroad, hold a summit in a foreign land and gather the forces of many other princes and kings, to block this crypto-virus from spreading?

Maybe. He and his soldiers, who he pays in Bright Prince Fiats, must team up with other lands to thwart this growing threat, before it’s too late.

…a gold standard…

In the meantime, some gold-bug few of the Prince’s own citizens, wealthy masters in their own right, the ones who have decried his use of fiats for years, call for a gold standard once again – and for the abolition of crypto, henceforth.

The prince, seeing a way out of the crypto-crisis begins to devise his plan.

The renewed gold standard is enacted, sort of.

The prince has all the land gather their hoards of silver and gold, deposit them into the banks he controls and promises his subjects, that from this day forward, sound money will reign supreme in all his lands.

The prince’s subjects, save a few wary ones, deposit their golden hoards, which they have hidden from the princes of past and present, into the princely vaults. Record amounts of gold, silver and diamonds, flood in and the subjects are ecstatic.

Even the prince smiles, benevolently praising his lands. “For the good of my subjects!” he laments. He feigns emotions at just the right moments, as his advisors have advised.

The subjects of the lands, relieved of the dual threat of the crypto-virus and the prince’s own fiat money scourge, forgive the latter and bash the former with abandon.

Pronouncements echo and postings are posted all over the lands. Town criers cry. On every tree and jailhouse wall, flapping in the breezes, are the grand and memorable memoranda: sound money is the order of the new day.

Of course, our Prince, along with all the other princes and kings; and not a few queens of dubious nature, have simply activated their plan to cast a shadow of disrespect over the whole of crypto.

“You see,” the prince quips, as he lounges on great pillows, attended to by subjects knowledgeable in the ways of arcane finance, “crypto is fiat…and princely sums are sound money – backed by gold and silver! I have returned to the ways of old gold!”

But the plans these of princes is most certainly a mirage. They, the princes and kings, the dubious queens and tyrannical tricksters, have merely confiscated the gold and issued multitudes of fiat. They have also declined to report the exact amounts of gold and silver in their safe-haven bank vaults, under their control and properly guarded by soldiers of the crown, by and for the good of all subjects, of course.

“Security,” says the prince, “is of vast and secret importance! Therefore, for the good of all subjects, I will keep the location and amount of princely precious metals undisclosed.”

…gold and silver and jewels…

What’s more, the prince, seeing to the secret security of all this gold and silver and jewels, has it moved from the banks and consolidated at his Summer Palace. A palace which is really a fortress far from his subjects and heavily guarded by loyal soldiers, who are paid in actual gold.

Princely subjects, fighting for the flag, dying for honor and dust, must dine, once again, upon the quantitative ease. No more are they worth, no less should they breathe.

Do you see any parallels here? This is essentially the repeating history of money. The Classical Liberal societies start with gold/silver monies then they devolve into socialistic fiefdoms and fiat systems controlled by the prince. A prince, who requires all your private information, to keep you safe from the wanton criminals and be able to reallocate your accumulated wealth as you live; and upon your demise, absorb your gold – all for the good of the prince’s subjects – meaning us, whether we like it or not.

And you wonder why the subjects currently trust fiat cryptocurrency over gold – for now.

The subjects – paupersdo not trust the prince.

Perhaps one should look at this trend. Bitcoin is gathering more interest than silver or the dollar. That’s an eye opener.

When do you suppose the interest in bitcoin will surpass gold? And does it have staying power?


Sincerely,

 

Your Friend in Crypto…

Jack Shorebird


Disclaimer: Believe none of what you read herein, half of what you see, and bow to the prince every night, before your subject-slumber, if you think that I’m not serious…

Cryptocurrency: Dreams in a Bottle or a Bubble?

Cryptocurrency: Dreams in a Bottle or a Bubble?

Dear Cryptocurrency and Freedom Lovers of Earth:

We are just dreamers waiting for the big bad bubble. Lean over and kiss your bitcoins goodbye.


Bubble Trouble

Cryptocurrency is a bubble.

It’s the 2.0 try-outs, since we didn’t believe them the first thousand times.

We love Ponzi, they insinuate. We probably initiate chain-emails in our sleep, insert cryptocurrency miners on your webpages, and dream of pyramid schemes…as we pay our extremely reasonable .gov taxes.

Cardano (ADA) will surely explode.

Monero (XMR) will implode.

Electroneum (ETN) will evaporate.

Ethereum (ETH) will wither smartly, and die.

Cheaters and meanies are hiding in the dark corners of those ICO-laced cryptocurrencies.

Bad people, the lot of them.

Run back to gold?

“Hey! But we love the blockchains! Just not the ‘people’ running them.

“You see, us banks and .govs – we do a much better job popping fiat bubbles. We just go around, blowing them up, making you go broke and then we do it all over again!

“And us metallic mega-hoarders, well, we can dig it too! And hopefully, one day in the far-flung future, gold will become what it once was: money. And then us mega-hoarders will win the day. We will say, on that day, if that day ever comes again that — we told you so!

“We can’t wait. It’ll happen soon, we promise!”

At least some of the gold bugs are on board the crypto-train. Guys like Mike Maloney. He’s a forward thinker, unlike others…

The lesser numismatic gods, the ones still hoping to influence President Donald Trump – to take the US back to gold – are instead bashing away at crypto. Maybe they don’t realize that they are, at the same time, bashing away at liberty itself. Not such a brilliant tactic as it is a calculated risk.

“Tell these Millennial dolts that cryptocurrency not stamped IN GOD WE TRUST and FEDERAL RESERVE NOTE is NOT money. Jeez, the humanity of it all. Tell them gold is the answer – immediately.”

Is that the general feeling you get from some of the golden metal-heads? The ones who warn of crypto-bubbles and hope for altcoin death, in situ.

And the best gold bugs? The proud Sharia Law complaint versions of them? “Oh Canada!” they sing aloud on their days off, from those frozen roof tops.

I take you now, dear reader to the halls of GoldMoney. In Canada. There, the money (no not money yet) is GOLD! Actually, the company was called Bitgold before that, but cited regulatory problems and low demand, before shutting down.

These golden folks have allowed to be posted on their website (and I’m almost certain it will be taken down like another YouTube video that fled in haste — business is war, right?) are the illustrious words of one Bubble Attacker: Alasdair Macleod. For shame. (My opinion.)

Macleod is an apparent researcher for the company in question, hence not the best disinterested party, right? A mouthpiece? Hmmm.

Then there is a far more corrupt banking industry to consider. Finance houses practicing insider trading. A Fed that feeds the US with worthless notes. Just read the headlines. Wells Fargo. JPMorgan Chase. Bank of America. Quantitative Easing. (Not an opinion. Facts.)

Need I say more? Aren’t you sick enough yet?

It’s not the banks or the .govs this time, however. It’s gold. Or more precisely, a troubled offshoot of gold bullion pushers surveying the crypto-landscape and taking careful aim.

 

Crypto Kills Fiat

To talk of cryptocurrency bubbles that will occur and describe them as a dire menace to .gov fiat is pandering to the .govs of the world. Gold money is a far worse threat to the .gov machinery and they – the bullion dealers — know it.

If people were actually allowed to use gold, silver, copper – as money – the Fed would close its doors and the Military-Industrial Behemoth would most definitely become rather irritated, if not hungry.

The .govs would need to finance themselves with real money then. No longer could they pass on the costs via inflation taxation. They would need to beg, borrow or steal the gold – again – from their subjects.

And that is always a problem, isn’t it? Gold theft?

And why can’t some companies see that? Especially ones in North America? Don’t they understand that before gold can become money again – that the entire centrally planned economic model must be dismantled? That laws must protect the people from their .gov?

It appears that Our Golden Savior of Canada is sounding that alarm, however. Or at least helping to ring a few bells to scare the cryptocurrency birds away. Darned pesky eagles just won’t die. They want to fly at any cost, even if it means creating their own crypto-fiat money in a world gone money-subservient.

It’s also a way of diverting attention – heat – from them. And a way to “sell more gold!” Soon they might begin knocking on our doors. Or you’ll see them at flea markets, not buying gold, but selling it!

Congratulations bullion traders of the Great White Socialistic North. Not that the US is that far behind either, but strike while the bubble is hot! And the bubble attack is ongoing.

But we need new material, not tired old rinse-and-repeats.

It reminds me of Chicken Little when he yelled, “the sky is falling!”

I’ll call them, those Gold Money guys and gals, Our Golden Savior. The bell ringers, who are losing investors to cryptocurrency. And who only want to make sure you and I aren’t being swindled, right?

After all, gold is money. No, it’s not. Not yet anyway.

 

The Warning

One Macleodian article on their website (and also here) talks to us about bubbles. But this does not irritate me as much as the Canadian based Sharia Law Compliant company does.

I mean, gold and precious metals are no doubt great value keepers, but dear fellas, we do not live in a golden age. I swear. I just called my bank. They said that they can arrange to store any gold I might wish to purchase; however, I can’t use it as money. (No thanks.)

You can’t spend it, your gold – in the US – like money. The IRS wants an accounting of each transaction. Just like cryptocurrency.

We live in a fiat-currency age – in the US. We are jammed in tight. Well, there is one out. It’s called cryptocurrency.

Gold is taxed as property in the US, which makes it terrible to use as money – even debit card based. I believe Peter Schiff advised this long ago, but now – he has joined them. And now…these facts seem to have drifted away. Little tax bombs ready to go off in April, when you have that “awe shucks” 1040 moment.

Don’t get me wrong, I would rather use precious metals, as money. I’d love to have a sound money system, but this fiat thing is just going to have to burn itself out first. Venezuela style. A little Greek fire, as it were.

The article in question asserts that gold is on the minds of many. Granted. Any form of sound money ought to be. If gold was money today it would be on everyone’s mind. Well, most everyone. Some actually like the fiat money system and socialist governments.

The write-up also warns, yet again, about the pure and shiny new bubble. The cryptocurrency bubble that is sure to burst – someday.

The problem is the golden .gov wall, however. We are all looking at that wall and asking ourselves the same questions.

Is there an alternative to gold, since I can’t spend it like cash?

Should I buy a few pieces of a precious metal and store it myself or should I use a gold bullion dealer in Canada? A dealer with gold all over the world in nice vaults – all on the ‘up and up’ – but far away…?

 

Crypto is NOT Money?

The primary debate against cryptocurrency, that it is not money, ought to be jettisoned.

We know this. We know it is not money.

Gold can be money, but it’s not either. It’s just gold, for now.

Cryptocurrency is more closely related to a functional currency or a service money, but it is a form of fiat currency as well. But a far superior fiat currency, for many reasons. And rather crappy, as well.

That’s what we are living with. We can use cryptocurrency, with all the associated risks or we can obey. Now do you understand?

Why did people risk their lives to come across the oceans in hopes of a better life? By comparison, this rather low-key way of transferring wealth is lame by comparison. It’s an exercise in freedom, however frail. The thing is, the .govs need to crush it in order to stop the virtual and peaceful sit-in.

 

A Bridge to Sound Money

Cryptocurrency is a bridge. It is a way back to sound money over the river of .gov fiat systems currently in place. It is the bank waiting to store the gold, so to speak. Only, the .govs stand in the way, so there is an impasse.

Who will blink?

How could crypto bridge to gold?

View it as a check or a contract.  A voluntarily enforceable one for now, but one that would easily fit in as a legally binding instrument against a rare commodity, such as a precious metal. Banks could accept cryptos in exchange for silver coins in some enlightened future. That ‘backing’ would likely stabilize cryptocurrency values.

The problem is that precious metals are currently locked out of legal tender status. The same can be said of cryptocurrency, except it has many other advantages neither fiat money or gold has – at present.

A gold bullion dealer is no less vulnerable to .gov regulations, than are most public cryptocurrencies. There are more private cryptocurrencies, however.

 

Privacy

And that brings up the idea of privacy. The love-child of cryptography and blockchain services.

Unlike the bullion company in question, where I need to give my name, address, income, photograph, ad infinitum – let them dig into my personal life – I don’t need to do that with many cryptocurrencies. Not with CryptoNote versions; and I can find ways around those exchanges now asking for my goods, as well.

The argument that the cryptocurrency companies, promote their own coin – buy in, pump it up – is a given. This is also true across the spectrum of stocks and bonds, in the restricted .gov regulated trading houses – where the brokers take their cuts and fees; and slice the pie more often than the average cryptocurrency exchange. All at the pleasure of .gov.

 

Early Adopters

Certainly, early adopters could make the most profits in a cryptocurrency economy. Ground floor opportunities have that potential, but this does not validate that a bubble is on its way. This is unlike the fiat cash flowing into the stock market and extinguishing any semblance of a P/E Ratio.

The obvious measure that bitcoin, for example, is a self-verifying property mechanism, is difficult to ignore. The limited virtual supply of bitcoin can drive its price. It’s ability to maneuver unhampered is juxtaposed with the .govs’ desire to bring it to heel. There is no P/E Ratio here. It’s absorption of one unstable fiat by a stable one.

Can that be said of our bullion buddies? Not the ones who sell us gold and silver and we stash it elsewhere, but the one in question. The one that essentially keeps our metal safely locked away where we will never see it and where any wayward .gov can grab it.

You call that safety? Try and grab my fiat crypto. Go ahead.

How did that work out for you?

It didn’t, huh?

 

The Undermine

And the fact that cryptocurrency can “undermine” capital controls is not a weakness. Money, ultimately, should be private. Taxes, ultimately, should be voluntary.

Did you not read the word “controls?” Who is doing the controlling and why? By what right?

Why must I send my cash via banks, be over-charged, wait days, when I can zip crypto to my Aunt in South America in seconds and do it much cheaper?

Hence, cryptocurrency is pro-freedom, whereas the company under scrutiny is compliant. But it must be, right? It has chosen the obedient path.

And fiat currency issued by .gov, is, of course, fiscal subservience.

If allowed to go mainstream, those cryptocurrencies that wish to comply with the long list of rules and fees, could certainly see radical value booms and busts. Obedience will have its profits.  After this alleged legal adoption, when the investment houses flood in, the public will take notice, as the assertion goes. The bubble will come as a result.

 

Pre-Bubble

So, the article in question makes the assumption that the .govs will eventually acquiesce to the public cryptocurrencies. Ones like traceable Bitcoin, Litecoin or Cardano. Then it all goes pop!

Why are the bubblers so certain? Past comparisons?

The South Sea bubble, where corruption was rampant? Government granted monopolies are not comparable to voluntarily purchased, transparent cryptocurrencies.

The Tulip Mania bubble is often cited, but the fact that much of Europe was debasing their currency at the time, is not often explored. Interesting parallels, but tulips aren’t cryptos.

Additionally, since many CryptoNote based cryptocurrencies are not designed with regulations in mind, this bubble warning only seems to apply to the public blockchains, like bitcoin and family.

According to the assumptions in the article, this future flood of bubble wealth into public cryptocurrencies will also cause prices to rise. Another dire warning.

That’s the static world view. In other words, more money into crypto equals more spending, equals less goods available, equals higher prices.

The problem is, when demand increases, in a free trade economy, the supply is often increased, and everyone wins. Prices often come down, in such economies.

This static theory of rising prices also ignores non-spenders. Some will save and not spend.

 

Choking

Yet another bubble warning is the “choke-off fable.”

Once and if .gov fiat currencies begin to falter, interest rates will be raised to entice crypto-investors away.

One problem with that scenario is rising interest rates slows the economy and could explode the debt and pop the fiat bubble all the faster.

Another? That crypto holds far more promise of profit than bank certificates.

If .gov could lure the crypto enthusiasts away from their chosen altcoins; however, what would stop them from also confiscating all the gold? After all, gold does compete with fiat currency and it makes fiat devaluation clear. An embarrassment to be certain, but one that can be easily remedied with an official announcement of fiat currency to gold conversion. It’s happened in the US before. Quite a choke I would say.

And we are only talking about the US here. There would need to be an international effort to quash crypto. Raise interest rates all over. And suffer the consequences.

A credit crisis would be the least of our problems then. Fiat currency would falter and I’d posit that cryptos, absent a move to a sound money standard (gold) by .govs — would maintain their purchasing power, so long as .gov didn’t zap the internet. Then we’d need to use stored reserves (gold/silver), eggs, canned goods and wine.

 

Conclusion:

The upside is that gold is real money, but it is not legal tender. Until then, it appears rather sluggish.

To state that private cryptocurrency is a threat to .gov fiats, that they could hasten their demise, is a bit disingenuous. Fiat currency is a threat to all of us already. If crypto hastens its demise, so be it.

The company in question is no less a threat and perhaps even more dangerous to investors, when one considers all the precious metals under their private control and the ability of any one .gov to remove said stores on a whim – or a “trumped up” national emergency.

In short, to return to a precious metal standard will require new laws in the US and elsewhere. It will require the closure of the US Federal Reserve, unless they begin to issue gold backed currency. It will then open the doors for competition between banks, with real money in their vaults. Money that should also be in your country of residence and not Dubai, Toronto, or Hong Kong.

Until then I’ll risk a crypto-bubble and pass on the debit card of gold, from the company in question. While waiting for the laws to embrace sound money, I will grow old and I hope rich, on the only form of successful liberty-currency I have ever witnessed in my lifetime: cryptocurrency.

 

Sincerely,

 

Jack Shorebird

 

P.S. Don’t let the .gov buttheads get you down. And think before you buy into Bitgold GoldMoney.


The above is my opinion. Make sure to consult your gold bullion dealer, economist, attorney, accountant and hair stylist, before you chance the Greatest Crypto Bubble of all time!

Bitcoin: Not a Value-Producing Asset?

Bitcoin: Not a Value-Producing Asset?

Dear Cryptocurrency Readers:

It’s good to keep tabs on the big picture while hoping for the good news. But don’t short change yourself if the time comes to make a choice between regulated or unregulated cryptocurrencies. It may be better to pay the tax, than pay the fine…or worse yet, be placed in a “political” prison cell.

Think long and hard about trying to hide your crypto stash and making your escape to some foreign island after you trade a chunk of it for some local fiat, gold or silver.

Things like crypto need to be won first in the courts, in countries where that is still possible. Political representatives must carry the banner and I feel that eventually, crypto needs an anchor. A hard currency. Only then will it be able to unhinge the fiat myth we have lived under for over half a century in these United States of America.

Is not that the ultimate dream of cryptocurrency?

It made many see, for the first time, that there is a way through this monetary nightmare we call government fiat currency. If it is only a pipe dream, that dream has had a lasting impact upon the minds of many – worldwide – I will posit. And dreams drive change.

Even if cryptocurrency dies, fifty years from now, people will remember, that for a brief time, the purse strings were almost given back to their rightful owners. The people. To you and me. We were almost back in control.

I write all of this in the hopes that I am dead wrong. That cryptocurrency, as it was meant to be, does not die, but evolves and helps to remake this decaying fiat world.

In short, this is not investment advice, it’s thinking advice. Education and speculation, is better than throwing the virtual darts at the virtual dart board.

For those who highlight cryptocurrency charts, citing all the technical reasons to “buy now,” know that the problem is a fundamental one. We need to look at the creators of these cryptocurrencies, why they make them, how they will work and so on.

Fundamental analysis is a must in the cryptosphere.

According to a MarketWatch article, Warren Buffet recently remarked that he thinks coin [cryptocurrency] offerings will end badly. “People get excited from big price movements, and Wall Street accommodates,” he said.

I don’t think Buffet gets it.

Buffet also advised that “You can’t value bitcoin because it’s not a value-producing asset.”

Now think on that a moment. “Not value producing.” That’s a fundamental issue, is it not?

So, it’s not a house or a farm or stocks. We know this. Buffet is not telling us anything new here, just couching it in investment terms. But remember, Buffet is also – if I can judge by his past statements – pro-big-government, pro-higher taxes for the wealthy…he’s a status quo kind of fellow. Rose colored glasses and all.

Guys like Buffet need what? They need the rules to remain “stable.” Capital gains taxes, income taxes, regulations, political support, all play into the scheme to use the system to earn more fiat money. Fiat money and other real assets, but all lubricated by a slowly crumbling (could be quickly) monetary system.

Bitcoin and company mucks up system, if they are seen as a currency replacement mechanism, say to the grand old investor types. So, they refuse to imagine the potential if such thinking requires them to start from ground zero. If it requires them to ask that burning question they refuse to hear: What is sound money? And the other one. Can we get along better without it if we pay off (buy) the bureaucrats and ask for special favors granted involuntarily, by the taxpayers?

But let’s compare.

Is digitized anything, say music, talk radio or even movies – are they value producing?

Yes, but they have an industry behind them. Singers, producers, directors, and labor unions. Companies with stock. Buildings, cars – the machinery of sight and sound.

Does bitcoin, specifically, have that same sort of structure? Or is it a bubble?

No. It has voluntary “assistance” right? Those who are willing and able to code and debug, right? There was no bitcoin creation company, as far as we know. Satoshi Nakamoto could be anyone or a group of communist sympathizers. We haven’t a clue.

Bitcoin is not an asset, in the traditional sense, only a service based upon secret codes, information exchange, shared data ledgers, miners, computers, internet use and so on. We know that bitcoin (currently) is very valuable, but subject to change, forks, political risk, clones, hackers and crowd sentiment.

Bitcoin is also subject to being replaced, at any time, by better technologies. Some new developer who can convince the world that this new bit of code is the cat’s meow.

Bitcoin is also subject to wide value fluctuations. Fluctuations, if you are risk tolerant, that can earn profits – or not.

So, bitcoin does not appear to fit any valuation model that I am aware of. Yes, it is anti-fiat, anti-capital controls, pro-personal banking, anti-inflation, anti-establishment, anti-tax, anti-status quo, and emotionally charged, probably a bit bubbly, but its asset value is, like Buffet contends – missing in action.

Is it just a numbers game?

Certainly, we are in new territory here.

Steve Wozniak of Apple fame thinks “cryptocurrency could become a better standard of financial value than gold or the U.S. dollar. Wozniak argued that Bitcoin is more stable and less prone to arbitrary supply changes.” This, according to a recent piece at Futurism.com.

If Wozniak does think, as the article suggests, that bitcoin is better than gold or the U.S. Dollar, he should qualify that statement.

Currently, the U.S. fiat dollar works, but into the future?

Gold? Well, it’s not used as legal tender in the United States in any huge way.

So, yes, right now, bitcoin appears to have a lot of advantages, except for what the article mentioned:  stability. You can’t depend on it.

Wozniak is a computer guy, not an economist. So, I would lean more toward the investor extraordinaire side – be a little Buffet-ish. But does not the truth land somewhere in the middle?

What seems to support Buffet’s words and may spell bad news for bitcoin and cryptocurrencies in general (maybe not Ripple or Stellar Lumens) is the recent news from AMD. AMD sells GPU’s which can be used for cryptocurrency mining. They are projecting losses now.

Does that mean cryptocurrency miners are no longer as interested as they once were? Or is it as this article explains, that the centralization of mining is requiring more than GPU’s? ASIC farms and other specialized processes, in China? Could it be a larger move away from mining altogether? A shift to Proof-of-Stake coins?

And then there’s the Russian angle to consider. Motherboard advises that the Russian Government is finally – if we can believe it – regulating these crowd funding mechanisms, i.e., cryptocurrencies. Taxation is coming to a miner near you – in Moscow. Wow, even America is past that part. Well, except for the registration part. “Papers please, Comrade!”

But what are the Russians really doing? Invading. It’s what aggressive regimes do. Take over other “countries.” This one is called “The Virtual Currency Country.” Dear Comrades, bend over and take it — be invaded.

Hey, don’t worry, America will probably join you soon. They will be a bit more coy about it, however. The bankers will hide behind the regulatory agencies, I’ll assert. Pushing them all the while to “register” all cryptocurrency related organizations, companies, and exchanges. Make them fall in line or suffer the fines, taxes and yes — Jail House Rock.

Just as Jamie Dimon hinted – arrests might be next. Oh, but they love the blockchain. Go figure. Wanna bet the bankers do not want a public blockchain — like bitcoin?

What does this tell you? That the banking industry will soon use the blockchain technology and then seek to outlaw all private cryptocurrencies? To monopolize cryptocurrency like they do fiat? With the blessing of the FED of course. Or maybe they will use a ready-made solution. Ripple? Hmmm.

Think again. Banking is about responsibility and control over the owned (official)  currency. They will want their own crypto’s. Crypto’s identified to their banks in some way. Ones that they control absolutely, if possible. If not, at least a Fedcoin, but then why would we need banks at all then?

Do you really think banks will outsource cash to Ripple? No, Ripple will be used to lubricate international transfers, until the banks figure out a cheaper system. A more profitable exchange mechanism.

If all this bad news continues, my concern is which non-establishment, unregulated cryptocurrency or system can survive and profit – long term – in such an environment? Will the ones which sought to comply with regulations early on survive in an anti-bitcoin world? Ones like Ripple? Ethereum? Stellar Lumens? How about Cardano?

And does this lack of backbone, a crypto’s desire to please the masters, only help to destroy a movement with the original intent to halt the devaluation of fiat currencies altogether? To replace the corrupt system, from the computer up?

Maybe so, but I still think that for now, one can profit if there are any major shifts from the dream – a private decentralized cryptocurrency – to the reality – soon to come “government regulated crypto.”

Not necessarily “state” created crypto, however. That wouldn’t be any different than the current fiat mess we are in now. In fact, it would be much worse. Every bit of your money could be tracked.

Welcome to a Brave New World.

That’s all for now.

In the meantime, you might want to store some coin on a Trezor.

Jack Shorebird


 

Bitcoin: “Attack of the Blockchain Clones”

Bitcoin: “Attack of the Blockchain Clones”

Dear Cryptocurrency Enthusiast:

Do you ever feel that some people need a good kick in the brain can?

Recently, I came upon a political night-rider imparting an alleged moral foundation. An alleged gem upon the cryptocurrency seashore. Only, it was a sharp stone.

I had discovered his name before, but until recently, never endeavored to explore the influential nature of his words. Never, do I hope he will be more than a crab upon the shore of true freedom. An insect at the beach.

But just in case…

I think now is a good time to mention him. Before your children say his name. Before you feel ignorant, and just in case he makes a name for himself. Which, he won’t.

Before all of that, you can say, “Yep, I have heard of him and Karl Marx. Do you remember the Jews that the Nazi’s killed? Great, I’m glad that the government schools still teach that. Well, anyway, same idea…”

***

His name is Amir Taaki, but he is not the real issue. It’s his personal software that is questionable — the programming in his brain.

Taaki is a coder of some repute, as well as an anarchist of vague degree. Meaning, as far as I can judge, a person who does not understand that an objective form of government is required to maintain individual freedoms. Therefore, Taaki is a liability upon the world stage. A regurgitation of the past.

Taaki is involved with bitcoin, having worked on Dark Wallet, a precursor to OpenBazaar and other projects, but that does not concern me as much as one of his potential teachers. The person or people who have coded him.

Taaki appears to “lack philosophy” as he implied when he was in Syria. What does that say about the man? It says the name of another man, actually. An American hero some might have called him. Others refer to him as a philosophical villain.

His name is Murray Bookchin. He was mentioned by Taaki, when he (Taaki) was fighting in Syria with the Kurds, against ISIS. Supposedly he had just come to lend support, but not to fight. A self-imposed duty called. He took up arms.

There is a warning here. Historians already know of its potential significance. It is not about what Lenin did to Russia in this case, but what America (via Bookchin) is doing to Syria. Invading Syria through what is called Communalism. Not communism exactly, but a shade of it, certainly.

Bookchin was an American anarchist, libertarian socialist and political theorist. He often reflected upon class struggle, was an avowed anti-capitalist, meaning that he was essentially against free and fair trade. He appears to have influenced Taaki and some factions fighting in Syria, for the greater glory, naturally. But it is not the glory these factions are after, as much — and more probably — a sort of militaristic socialism.

Anarchism, is of course, gang rule, with no objective laws, where the most ruthless criminal can rule just as easily as a moral king. One cannot conveniently redefine it, but Bookchin tried. Taaki is trying.

The US, as of yet, is not ruled by anarchist fiefdoms. We are not yet at the stage of full revolt. We are not ready to substitute one form of tyranny for a Bookchin Communalistic Paradise. Nor should Syria be led down the Bookchin road.

Bookchin’s revamping of communism is a claxon. Know that the bells have sounded. Long before Syria, Turkey, Iran and others – fell. If that will happen. If it does, and I hope it won’t, fingers will point. They will point at Bookchin.

The disease is spreading.

And please tell me that Bookchin and Blockchain are unrelated.

Bookchin wanted majority vote, but not majority rule and he tried to explain that one for years. He also wanted assembly-led enterprises. In other words, no free enterprise at all. A type of social dictatorship, but not quite of the communist model. It is often referred to as a “communalist” type of organization. Community led — scratch that — community ordered, comrade.

Looking through the Murray Bookchin filter, as some are want to do, lends lethality to the drumbeat call for decentralization. Not for the blockchains, but for humans. The only difference is that humans are not chained in the first place. We are not part of some giant cloned ledger.

There is no comparison between the technology of bitcoin and individuals.

Anarchy, as espoused by the Bookchin-ites, is not decentralization as some might ask you to believe. It is disorganization. It is decentralization of organization. Divide and conquer. Disintegration. A rapid breakdown of morally based laws (we can argue about that) in favor of range of the moment substitution. Pragmatism v. reason. Honesty v. “get it done.”

And here is the social mirror some are suggesting we hold up to the blockchain ledger. If bitcoin or better yet, if some private cryptocurrency ledger can organize an accounting method, where everyone’s currency is safe and secure, why can’t humans be like blockchain ledgers? Hold the power to self-manage? A type of self-organized dialectic.

Dear readers, we are not Blockchain Clones. We are individual people, all with different abilities and desires. Our intellectual savings differ. Our ability to mine knowledge, to produce information, to educate, are all different. We are not cryptocurrency clones. We were never social “smart contracts.” We are different. Blockchains are identical.

The ideas of cryptocurrency decentralization are not transferable to the human context. Blockchains are not anarchistic representations of social structures, but orderly algorithms without emotions or desires. They are arbitrary and robotic rules of math, editable by humans. Controlled by a few humans.

Pause here. We own the process of blockchains. Not the opposite.

If we transfer the decentralization aspect of blockchains to society, we become numbers on the social ledger. And some few “developers” will control the technology of the social blockchain. A small core group. Hence, the idea — the false flag — that blockchains are decentralized only refers to the nature of the ledger. In fact, the technology is highly centralized.

To gift humanity with the ability to transact, without the necessity of an intermediary? Without humanity? A digital promissory note to ensure that contractual transactions are completed? That is the promise, right?

Where is the human watchdog? Answer? Blank out. Who is watching the developers? All of us? Can we influence their process? Maybe. If they refuse to give us what we want? We can use Litecoin, right? We can try some of that dark net stuff — Monero.

But where are we then? Back to yet another centralized blockchain. A programmed ledger we can clone and use. We only hope the developers stay on the job. Hope they don’t act in a way that will destroy the value in our chosen coin.

This being the case, to engender trust, the math of cryptocurrency should be provable, verifiable, and secure. It should be objective and not subject to the whims of cryptocurrency developers.

This is a tall order. It requires human cooperation. It requires auditors. It needs checks and balances. Some type of transparency.

The people who control the math should have watchdogs at their heels. Inspectors, not beholden to the math-makers in any way, should have complete viewing access to the code. If something is amiss, they should report it to the public or be jailed for complicity.

It is called the “human element.” Imperfect, for sure. But why it is required? Obvious, is it not? Some humans steal. And, what does absolute “monetary” power do to humans? What does any kind of communal power do? It corrupts them.

Bitcoin can be audited. Anyone can access the code and audit the system. Anyone can trace any transaction, which, unfortunately, is unfavorable to human privacy. The other problem is, as I have mentioned, bitcoin is centrally controlled by a handful of developers.

Machines are oblivious. Algorithms have no feelings. They are not concerned about where you buy your booze, that you have a health problem or if you like romance fiction — with photos.

Maybe the auditors cannot read a name, find a home address without a court order, in some cases, but much can be inferred from the transaction records of bitcoin and clan. Much privacy is lost.

Could this have been the noob “selling point?” We are all one? Your money is mine, sayeth the dev? Bitcoin or Nirvana? Decentralization at all costs? Why Taaki might support the idea for human consumption? Developers are our new rulers?

To ensure confidentiality, bitcoins are sometimes transferred via mixers to stop the auditors in their tracks. But there are other problems.

Suffice it to say, bitcoin coders are still working on Dandelion. A way to secure transactions — to obfuscate IP addresses and so on. And there are arguments about the process as well.

Privacy is a difficult maneuver in the cryptocurrency realm. Many projects exist. Dash, Monero, CloakCoin, NavCoin, Aeon, and even ZCash. The idea is to obfuscate the transactions in such a way as to keep everything as private as possible.

The problem then becomes one of trust. How do we trust a cryptocurrency that cannot be audited in certain ways? Shall we watch the “old guard?” The bankers?

Answer? Yep. Profit from their “transition.” Why not? Profit as JP Morgan Chase adopts Zacash software. Why not?

Let’s consider a real-world comparison example. I mean, even if privacy based blockchains might fail in the wild, as it were, it does not mean that governments won’t take up the mantle of public (transparent) bitcoin.

Cash is an anathema, to highly centralized governments.

If I go to the store and use cash to buy a soda, the clerk takes my money, gives me my change and I walk away with my drink. There’s no record of me personally buying that soda, in most cases. My cash was private. I stored it in my wallet, walked into a strange store, didn’t care to know the address and exited with a cool drink.

If I’m a bad guy, I can use my cash to buy a Russian Suitcase Nuke, but it’s risky. Complicated. I can do a dead drop, place my cash in a bag and hope the suitcase is left at an agreed upon location.

As a terrorist, I could exchange cash for plastic explosives in Syria, say near the Iranian border, but I should probably have a bunch of soldiers with big Kalashnikov rifles to protect me.

If I’m a cocaine dealer, I can stand on a curb, risk being arrested or robbed and shot at any second, and accumulate cash.

How can criminals magnify cash (currency) using a private cryptocurrency, however?

Nearly instant international payments — until they are stopped.

A security nightmare, but freedom and security have been at odds for a long time. A balance most difficult to find. Betwixt and between centralization and personal security. The desire to be free and desire to be safe. Power and irrelevance. Privacy and publicity.

Cash can’t fly, but banks can — even unwittingly — assist with international criminal remittances. But why pay the bank fees and risk investigations by Interpol?

Hidden internet markets where Zcash, Bytecoin or Monero can be used to purchase stolen credit card numbers with no risk to the seller. This is a real problem. Try to buy a list of stolen identities with bitcoin or cash. Much more complicated. Increasingly more problematic as governments tighten money transmission rules, ostensibly to catch the criminals – oh, and the tax savers.

To state that private or “mixed” cryptocurrencies do not or cannot assist criminals by asserting that cash is king, is not giving the “international picture.” Sure, private cash is a double edged sword. It gives the power to individuals, but it also magnifies the powers of groups — and criminals.

The decentralization of the network is, in this sense, misleading. It is simply a method of financial attack.  It’s called overwhelming force, by swarming. The use of a decentralized force against an opponent, in a manner that emphasizes mobility, communication, unit autonomy and coordination and/or synchronization – from Wikipedia. Create an army of like ledgers, cloned nodes and depend upon the masses to keep the fires burning – keep updating their ledgers.

Alas, however, this is a hushed and feeble war.

Do you see it? It’s one ledger, with a cloned horde that can attack day and night anywhere there is a piece of tech, an internet connection and voltage. But who controls the tech-gear, internet and the electricity?

And in real war, real change, the armaments are diverse. The attack vectors erratic. The volume of force, unknown, until it is too late. Currency is one vector, but it is a main one.

Time to rouse from the daydream, crypto-noobs. For now, crypto is dependent upon the old substructure. That is where it rests. That is where it should gather its trust and strength, but not form its misplaced revolution.

This is not the anarchist core. Blockchain is not anarchy. It is not order from decentralization. It is the clone army. Hit the command center — the developers (core team) — and it folds like a cheap suit. The clones will become weak — unless someone creates another cloning machine — feeds them “updates” — debugs them regularly.

And this dreamed of moment of truth is crucial. It can be subverted. Others can subsume its power to encapsulate the population(s). We must have watchers in place. No Taaki’s should subvert the message, without a fight.

I have no desire to be a part of a crypto-horde and, await the day when this old-fashioned ledger technology is jettisoned in favor of an atomic cryptocurrency, without one. To me, that would be the Holy Grail. A true cryptocurrency. The evolution. (An idea not so well received by the Murray Bookchins of the world.)

Individualism is not reliance upon yourself. It is voluntary cooperation with others. It is the very essence of freedom. Blockchains — if transposed to governing — is slavery. What did Bookchin want? What does Taaki, and admitted drifter and squatter, want?

But I’m just a voice in the wilderness, far from the Murray Bookchins, communists, socialists, Leninists, Trotskyists and Communalists of yester-death. Many sounded the  alarm before me — about Murray Bookchin and Occupy Wall Street.

Until then, the blockchain-clones are the best thing going in finance, if only because they usurp the power of central banks in some small way.

And if the “old guard” finance houses have judged Zcash as great tech, we can profit from their interest, me thinks.

And it concerns me that more and more big guns are coming out of the closet to “protest” the bubble of bitcoin – but not Zcash? Not Bytecoin or Monero. Why now?

What else do these big guns know? Do they have insider information or do they want to quash cryptocurrency altogether via regulation?

And a final thought…

Are Satoshi Nakamoto’s original coins really sitting dormant? Would it not be masterful, if they weren’t really there?


For those of you who understood my blog yesterday and profited – bully to you. Occasionally, I get them right.

For now, Zcash.

Next week?

 

 

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