Cardano (ADA) is NOT Money, but that’s Okay — neither is Bitcoin…

Dear Cryptocurrency Enthusiasts,

I heard the air just go out of the room. How can I dare say such a thing? I mean, why? Why challenge the Gods of Crypto? Because I listen to them when they say really dumb things and I’m a bad little sheep. I crap on their stage and bleat. It’s okay, I’m just a little sheep. Not much to worry about.

After reviewing several recent videos put out by the more vocal cryptocurrency developers and evangelists I wanted to reiterate a few things about what these pro-cryptocurrency, blockchain promoting, initial coin offering gurus and family, might be obfuscating: reality. (There. I just let one go. Plop.)

And this goes for nearly all cryptocurrencies. Bitcoin, Litecoin, Sexcoin, Ether-bum and Frogpennies included.

What? There are no Frogpennies? You mean I was scammed? Again? Dammit man!

I’m no newbie to this financial vehicle. I’ve been around the bend. Lost and gained. And I’m still here. Still playing the game. Still bleating and trading — and winning — for now.

“Freaking gambler!”

Hey…relax.

So, this a reality check, from a fan of cryptocurrencies. (That’s me. Don’t forget that part.)

Is cryptocurrency anything other than a speculative vehicle?

I mean, look at where most of the money is going in cryptocurrency markets.  Most of the investment is going into bitcoin. Currently, bitcoin’s market capitalization is nearing $100,000,000,000.  Each BTC is now (almost) worth – $6000 each. It kind of wobbles there — for now.  Certainly, another milestone for cryptocurrency at large.

But is bitcoin worth anything at all? Go ahead. Torture yourself about energy, electricity and nodes. What type of value, other than a service value, does any cryptocurrency have?

Tick-tock.

How’s the mental argument going? Feeling twisted up yet? Okay, I’ll let you off the hook. It’s better for your blood pressure that way.

Wait a minute… The older guys and gals take this crap in stride. It’s just the younger ones who need to chillax. We’ve — us elders — been around the apple cart a few more times.

“Oh, but times have changed!”

No. They have not. Crooks are always crooks, not matter the century. Dummies are always dummies. Blonds are…  Never mind.

In the cryptocurrency world, there’s a lot of conjecture about the nature of money itself.  So, I’d like to explore that a bit. Remind the wandering souls who left their gamer chairs and headed over the crypto-couchs for beer and saki.

Hopefully, these wandering post-gamer types (Vitalik?) will sober-up before it’s too late — for the rest of us broke investors.

So, let’s get to it.

One of my favorite definitions of money was provided by Ayn Rand. If you don’t know her, consider yourself — sorry — uneducated. Okay, maybe that was harsh. But if you are in the Fintech world, you ought to be ashamed.

If you go to aynrandlexicon.com and look up the word “money,” you will find the seeds of what I’m about to go over, there.

The Lexicon pulls this definition from a piece that Rand did titled “Egalitarianism and Inflation,” from the book titled Philosophy: Who Needs It, page 127. (Go ahead, look it up. You can google it. I’m tired of giving out shortcuts like candy.)

So, let me compare cryptocurrency to money. I think that a lot of people are disregarding this very important definition — to their own detriment.

According to Rand, money is a tool.  A tool that can be used to exercise long range control over one’s life. A tool that can be used for saving. A tool that permits delayed consumption. And, a tool that buys time for future production.

Think on that a moment. Pick up a wrench. Caress it. Did you just fondle money? Well, kind of.

Is cryptocurrency a tool? Can you fondle a crypto? Would you want to?

Certainly, crypto is a type of tool or at least an application, but it requires something a money-tool does not. Cryptocurrency requires energy. Electrical energy. It also requires a computer, software, regular updates, dedicated developers and user cooperation. These are only a few of the cryptocurrency requirements.

In other words, crypto is a “user of tools.”

Can a cryptocurrency be used long range, however? The apparent answer is that it cannot be used beyond a few years, without improvements. So, in this respect cryptocurrency cannot be used to exercise control, in a long-range manner.

Crypto is a shorty sporty.

Can cryptocurrency be used for saving? And by saving, I mean saving something of value (a tool — remember) that one can come back to in a week, a month, a year or longer — and pick it up, dust it off and say, “Wow, it’s still good as new.”

The simple answer, again, is no. Attempting to save cryptocurrency beyond one week might be very risky. Yes, I’ve heard about bitcoin. Probably, before you.

In this respect, cryptocurrency cannot be used to delay any consumption for greater than perhaps a few days. It cannot buy time for the future. Gold, for example, buys one “time” in a sense that one can delay using it for years.

Let’s look at another aspect of money that Rand indicated was a definite requirement.

Money must be a material commodity that is imperishable. Not a banana or pork bellies. Not energy or “trust.” Not nodes or networks. Material…and a commodity. A tough and tumble thing that just holds the fort and takes no prisoners — not even during “World of Warcraft.” (That should probably be Witchcraft. It just fits better.)

Now, you might ask what (exactly) is “imperishable.” And it is clear cut –  it is something that cannot perish or if it does perish it would take some serious effort. Computers and networks and games — they all go “bye bye.” Time kills them.

Cryptocurrency shall perish from this earth — I mean — eventually. Maybe in a few years. Maybe after Fedcoin awakens and the apparatchiks get going. Make a few arrests. Tax people into the poor house. A bit of insurance policy suicide.

So crypto is perishable, but for now, it’s a great fruit. Sort of like one of those irradiated, dehydrated apple chips. It’ll last for a few years on your counter, but once the dog finds it, yum-yum.

If the power goes out in your area, can you spend, save, and borrow a bitcoin? If your country makes cryptocurrency illegal, will you still use it? If, a few years from now, a newer and much better cryptocurrency is invented, what will happen to your preferred cryptocurrency? It just rotted. Perished into the doggy mouth.

Rare. Money should also be rare. Something that is abundant, easy to produce, easy to copy, easy to “fork,” does not meet the definition of rare. Think copy-machine. Think clones. Think, fiat-money.

Artificially reduced numbers on a digital ledger does not meet the definition of money, but it could be a type of functional currency. Reduced numbers of cryptocurrency atomic units do meet the definition of “limited,” but digital information is not in and of itself, rare.

Unless you print this — the words you are now reading (and why you waste you time here, I’ll not ask) — are born of code. Pixels instructed to turn on and off, by a bit of computer code, fed through a electronic processor. Okay, it’s not the best code. Not a crypto-code, but you catch my drift, don’t you?

Codes are not rare. They can be secure, however.

Money must be homogeneous too. Standardized. Similar. A dollar bill looks the same and spends the same all over the U.S. and many other places. (Yes, I know dollars suck — but they spend.)

Multiple kinds of functional money, i.e. cryptocurrencies, are not standardized. Although, many cryptocurrency technologies are similar they are not, for all intents and purposes identical. There is no standard. (Maybe that’s good, actually.)

Money must be easily stored.

Generally, this might mean that money is compact, perhaps stack-able, able to be placed in one’s pocket, transportable and able to be secured.

Yes, I know gold is heavy and past presidents in the US have stolen it from the people — and that it’s really hard to steal crypto.

But you know what’s even harder to steal than crypto? My thoughts. Electronic (and chemical) codes I can relay to you via spoken or written words.

I have secret thoughts too. Try and take them. On second thought, don’t — you might get sick. I’ve seen some pretty messed up things in my life.

Is cryptocurrency easy to store? In some sense, saving information on your computer is quite easy. But is that true storage in the physical sense? And isn’t that what we’re after? The ability to place money in a safe, under your mattress or in a tin can in your backyard?

Are my thoughts money? I think I have nodes too. My neurons are decentralized in my brain for sure. Billions of nodes, just humming along.

Money should not be subject to wide fluctuations of value, according to Rand. This seems straightforward. Sort of like, “Duh!”

My thoughts fluctuate. Crypto pops up and runs to ground often. I wonder, can I trade my thoughts on an exchange?

If you place a government issued coin in your pocket, unless you live in Venezuela, it will probably maintain its value throughout the day, perhaps an entire year.

On the other hand, if you stored a bitcoin on your computer hard drive, next week it could be worth twice as much or half as much.  And this goes for most other cryptocurrencies as well.

Not so for my thoughts. They are worth zilch, until I use them to develop something — say a crypto. There, I just did. Did you feel it? Wanna buy some thought-crypto?

So, fiat currencies are terrible, but they generally hold their value over longer periods of time – a stable value — when compared to cryptos. Especially my thought-cryptos.

What else is important about money?

Well, if you can’t go to the market and spend it, there’s a problem. If you can’t buy a cup of coffee, a soda, or a car – anywhere you normally go – there’s a problem.

Oh, please don’t bring out that BTC ATM map. Just go to the store and let them stare at you like you are a “nerd.” (Hint: you are. But it’s okay. They meet on Wednesdays, I think. Make sure to bring your pencils.)

So, if a cryptocurrency is to become a functional money it must be in demand among those you trade with. Not only the Wednesday “Nerd” Group. Currently, cryptocurrency also fails in this respect.  Let me repeat that, currently. Today.

(Note: Nerds may conquer the universe. Just look at Bill Gates. He’s got his own crypto now. “Way to go Bill, you copycat. No, I know you did not copy Apple…”)

Let’s get back on track, before Billy gets made and shuts this blog down. Really, I apologize Billy. I know you love crypto too.

Using Rand’s definitions, it seems that the only true money is gold.

“Oh not that rock thing again. You’re so retro, dude!”

Straighten up. Get a job, before your dad kicks you out.

Gold has a tangible value, but, as Rand states it, gold is “…a token of wealth actually produced.” Moreover, the transaction itself becomes much safer, much simpler, because it is like bartering.

Let’s recycle.

“No, Mr. Retro. I need to get back to War of the Witchs II!”

Money is a tool.  Cryptocurrency is an application that uses a tool – a computer.

“So.”

Tools can be used over long periods of time. We do not know how long cryptocurrencies will last.

“You mean it’s like a new modified game?”

No. Listen.

“Why?”

One can save a money-tool. If one saves a cryptocurrency application, it may be outdated within the year.

“Yep, just like my computer games. I sort of get it now.”

If you delay using your cryptocurrency, you may lose all your money – all your value.

“Right. You can’t sell used games for squat after a few months!”

The money-tool ought to be imperishable. Cryptocurrency is perishable.

“Games are dead soon after release!”

Right and a cryptocurrency is not a material commodity.

“True. I download my games now.”

Cryptocurrency is not rare, only mathematically limited.

“You got me there, grandpa.”

Cryptocurrency is not homogeneous in the sense that it is standardized among the persons with which you trade. If cryptocurrency were standardized, this might increase its demand.

“Yeah, a lot of dudes can’t stand War of Witchcraft at all! No demand. Puds.”

Cryptocurrency requires a stable value – if it is to escape the bonds of speculation.

“Hey, I made a few bucks with mining Piggycoin a few years back!”

Aside from the fact that cryptocurrencies do not meet the ‘Randian’ definition of a sound money, this does not mean that its value will not increase.

“Like I said, the Piggy was good to me. But my mom got tired of the high power bills and the gizmos making all of that noise.”

Even if governments choose to define cryptocurrencies in different ways, those jurisdictions with the least amount of regulations appear to be reaping the benefits of increased Fintech investments, for now.

“I heard that. But I’m not leaving America for some European paradise.”

Cryptocurrency is also voluntary. Fiat currency is not.

“That’s the point, right?”

Cryptocurrency is also trustworthy, in many cases. Many people trust the math, but some are concerned about the developers who write the code.

“Dude, you are confusing the hell out me. First you say they suck, now you say they don’t?”

Is fiat currency trustworthy? It depends upon the country, the economy and the leadership.

“Oh, yeah. Bummer.”

One thing is certain, however, even with two arms tied behind its back, decentralized cryptocurrency has captured the imagination of the people.

I think that any blockchain adoption by governmental entities, will only serve to solidify the people’s belief in the private use of the blockchain technologies.

I’ve also included a YouTube video of mine, highlighting some of the above issues.

“Dude, can I go back to my games now?”

Sure.

 

Sincerely,

 

Jack Shorebird

P.S. I’m selling my thoughts for one BTC each. Guaranteed to be far more awesome than any cryptocurrency ever mined, minted, spat out, staked, gassed-in or farmed-out. There is a limited supply of my thoughts because one day I’ll be dead. (Shut up, I heard that.) Just leave a reply and we can work out the details. I’m not going to leave my BTC address. That’s just tacky as hell, don’t you think? Hurry, this is a limited time offer — maybe less that 30 years before it ends and my decentralized network will cease to function.

 

(Disclaimer: The above is the opinion of this writer. Any appearance to reality is merely a coincidence. If it bothers you, mine some ‘coin.)

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The Ugly Truth About Bytecoin

 


Why do they hide?

In my recent audio blog, I review some important aspects of Bytecoin. Things they — the Teto-Team and Jenny — don’t seem to want to talk about.

Audio blog: The Ugly Truth about Bytecoin

 

Bytecoin: The Good News?

Dear Readers and Listeners:

Be careful of those dark cryptocurrency streets. You never know who is out there…

I’ve been tracking Bytecoin (BCN) for several years. Reported on it in other blogs and have had the good luck to contact some of the movers and shakers of late. Those who are developing new websites, businesses, videos, and news blogs. They are marching steadily forward with an eye to business adoption and commerce – and not just events and interviews, like we often see with other cryptocurrency “hype.”

That is not to say that Bytecoin can’t be hyped like any other coin, but clearly – people are beginning to creep toward adoption. With all the past negativity surrounding this coin, I am amazed. They predicted collapse of this currency has not yet happened.

And just to straighten your head out, I don’t currently own any Bytecoin. I have in the past, however, and am once again considering an investment.

Bytecoin is refusing to die. Not only is it refusing to die, the newest set of supporters are pushing out, worldwide – if the ads are true.

Perhaps, and this is conjecture, it is not that Bytecoin is a wonderful cryptocurrency. Perhaps, it is riding the success of Monero (XMR). It’s brethren. Or maybe Monero’s fame is making people more curious. Both coins are dark horses. Both are essentially private, but which one operates better? You be the judge.

So far, we know of at least two new names associated with Bytecoin’s reawakening: Jenny Goldberg and Pundit Pawan Sharma. There are others, we are told, but everything seems to be in the works for now.

Anonymity is the idea here, so I wouldn’t expect more names to be released soon. If we can accept that Goldberg (probably another pseudonym) is in contact with the original Bytecoin developers, she is probably keeping a low profile for obvious reason.

Goldberg could also be one of the originals or a new owner of the code. We just don’t know for certain. And uncertainty – and money – don’t mix well.

But…we live in an uncertain world now.

Is this why Bytecoin might work in a world where money itself is becoming more indeterminate each day? Where the value of our paper fiats is falling or like in India, cash is made valueless overnight by ruthless politicians? Where even the old standby, gold, cannot seem to rise to the occasion?

We often think of price manipulation when it comes to gold – and silver. Why, in the face of fiat currency devaluation, have the price of the rare earth metals not risen into the stratosphere? Is the answer as simple as: we do not use them as money – currently? If we did?

Certainly, this is all food for thought.

The teams associated with Bytecoin are – if we can believe it – from India (Delhi, I believe), Russia, South Korea, China, and Singapore. I’m not certain if Jenny Goldberg is from one of these countries. I take it that Community Managers exist in these areas.

One question is of course, how does one become a Community Manager? Does Goldberg appoint them?

Pundit Pawan Sharma is from India and his website(s) can be found on the internet. Bytecoin.org.in is one of the Indian sites. The domain age is recent, so it still has not attracted a lot of traffic. That might change. The website is professional.

It is my understanding that Sharma is one of the Indian Community Managers.

Regarding the resurgence of Bytecoin, the new Community Managers have requested and received changes to the Bytecoin Road-map, through Jenny Goldberg, according to my research.

It also appears that the new managers, however they are appointed, are more interested in use case scenarios. India and the reports of temple donations. Or are these only publicity stunts?

Maybe not.

What is different this time, however, is the connection of Bytecoin, with real people. Well, check that, the connection between Goldberg and the Bytecoin elders (allegedly) and the newest crop of commercial folks trying to give it a go – again.

Before, we had a list of personalities. The early Bytecoin crew, as it were. The Teto-Team. A team that kept quiet after writing some pretty high brow articles on Bytecoin.org. Guests also blogged for the Team.

But the blogs often carried a note of foreignness. Something distinctly not “English,” but close. They – the Bytecoin blogs – had a sort of choppy feel. In fact, they still do.

Might the Teto-Team be real people? They could just as easily be complete fiction. If that is the case, it would only be more fuel for the fire. A conflagration of trust.

It would be nice if they – the Teto-Team – could arrange a meet-up on the internet or appear at an event. Not necessarily a public one, but a verifiably recorded one. Real people in silhouettes answering the hard questions. Even Zcash has their “ceremonies” and judging by their continued success, publicity is working.

There are hints that this might soon happen. That the Teto-Team might pay us a visit?

I think I could even drum up some questions, just let me know. In fact, I ask that anyone who has a question for the Teto-Team or Bytecoin in general, leave them in the comments below, go to Reddit or even peruse BitcoinTalk.org.

What is important about this connection, however thin, to Monero, Aeon and the surviving CryptoNote cryptocurrencies? Bytecoin was allegedly the first mover, but became sidetracked.

There are many reasons for this. Alleged pre-mine scams. Fudged whitepaper dates. Creating more coins than allowed by the original software. But the coin has never died. It has refused. Why?

Is it just the loads of newbies (new investors) piling on? Are the Bytecoin dev’s simply skimming a few more bucks off the top as the ship sinks?

We are told this is not the case.

Regardless of all the negative, more positive seems to flow from Bytecoin now.

There are vendors coming online. Ben Tea is one. The site’s listed owner is Ira Sharma out of New Delhi, India. It’s less than a month old as of September 26, 2017. You can load up Scamadviser.com to get a read.

Here is a new site: Bytepay. Founded in August of 2017, according to the website. The site might be in Germany and/or the United Kingdom – according to Scamadviser.com. It is a payments solutions company and offers shopping cart plugins. The website features a video.

And All Things Luxury is new another site where you can spend your BCN. The domain age is over six years, but in this case, the owner is not listed. The website indicates a Canadian address and Scamadviser.com shows a US based website. Currently, one can pay with Bitcoin and Litecoin, but there does not seem to be a direct Bytecoin pay method.

Although Bytecoin lost Cryptopia’s business, it is picking up CoinSpot. They are in Melbourne, Australia, which is interesting because Cryptopia was in New Zealand. When you run Scamadviser.com you find that CoinSpot is a highly trusted website based in the US. Russell Wilson is listed as the owner.

The new BCN Wallet (web wallet) appears chancy at best. The site is less than two months old, appears to be located in the US, but the owner is unknown.

A mobile (cell phone) wallet is next, we are advised.

By September 28, 2017, Bytecoin will have a new website. I expect a surge in volume and prices when – and if – this happens. Forgive my skepticism, but Bytecoin slept for a time.

If Bithumb begins to trade Bytecoin, all bets are off.

There is also a YouTube Channel for Bytecoin now: Bytecoin BCN. It was from the comments on this channel that I came upon a hint about a Litecoin and Bytecoin cooperative venture. But I find nothing about this online. The commenter left no link or other way to verify his assertion and he has not responded to questions.

What is the solution to all of this? How can we preserve the privacy of the Bytecoin creators and come to understand the coin’s history?

There are so many variables here. Who is holding most of the Bytecoin? If 80% of the coin can be dumped on the market at one time, who will ensure the coin’s survival after that?

Think about that. If you could stash 50 million dollars, secretly, and live happily ever after, as the creator of Bytecoin, why would you continue to work?

And maybe that is the answer. If Jenny Goldberg has the keys to the code, then maybe she can ensure its survival.


Jack Shorebird

 

The Little Fiefdoms of Smear


First of all, to all you wingnuts out there, take a breather. Go toke one. This is for the working Americans out there who give a crap. If you think your neck of the woods is crème de la crème, go soak your missing handgun in it.

Secondly, communists, socialists, Nazis, pansies and other wackos, slave-makers and dirt-bags, you are welcome to peruse and pop a blood vessel. Why? Because this post is full of radical ideas. It’s call free speech and you are welcome to try and snuff it out.

As a matter of fact, I think a gaggle of wannabe freedom wreckers are already pecking away at their keyboards, presently. I can almost hear them now.

“You mother blanker, I’ll call my congressman.”

“I’ll write an email to WordPress.”

“I’ll hire an out-of-work attorney.”

“I’ll call my mother.”

“I’ll get my gang of ex-con Nazi skin head tattooed former union thug followers to crush you!”

This is not my standard post. So scrap it and read some good stuff. Some other trash. Soak your brains in it and your low parts, with perfume and sawdust for all I care. Because that’s what we see today. So much stuff — and that’s the nice word.

But you know the word(s) I’m fricking thinking about, don’t you? Just pick one or two. Draw it on your forehead with your wife’s lipstick or your man’s rouge, so you can reverse read it in your bathroom mirror later, after your toddy.

“! H S A R T”

Just so we can have some fun and get around the anus censors. For those of you who gossip and have those picnics under the “chem trails” —

! o u y  k c u F

Now, I realize that I will likely spark a bit of bible thunder, but at the same time, I don’t give a blank.

Today’s news and opinion isn’t about cryptocurrencies, although for those of you who have been holding Ripple for a long time — a love-hate relationship for me — congratulations, your ship came in, floated for a bit then took a crap again. But that’s how Ripple rolls. Get over it.

Bloggers who tilt at Windmills

No, this post is about “Little Fiefdoms” or the bloggers who tilt at windmills and rant at the moon. Then take a huge stinking crapola, behind all the pretty little sand castles. We’ve all seen them – smelled them. They litter the net like so much garbage. Words to smear and anger, but little substance. A blemish upon the freedom of speech, but one that should never be silenced. That is the evil game of the “Little Kings.” Crapola kings and their sweet honey-bee queen followers.

It is a unique environment to be sure. From the days I blogged on Prodigy , got censored, or the months I puked my junk all over the Bulletin Boards, until now. Until just a few days ago, after I received a response to one of my replies I posted to a blog about…well about a lot of things. Some of it good and much of it, filled with vitriol. I was advised that if I continued to speak my mind, my responses would be deleted. Oh, you can imagine my balls then, can’t you? The little queen bee was gonna pull my response.

It’s a gem of a response — but also a measurement. A way of taking the temperature of a fevered patient and know when he/she is sick. And this patient? On the brink of reason, but never quite adapting to the human form. In short, sick in the philosophy.

The Deleted Minds

I asked the blogger in question to delete all of my comments. I’ve deleted garbage from my posts as well. You know the spam we receive. Loads of it. Idiots smearing. Jerks, probably high or drunk. Racists, socialists, people who forgot to take their meds. We know.

It was…hilarious. It is always that way. I imagine a person, frustrated about life and politics, blaming everyone around them, especially their own countrymen, that all of the problems would go away if only the US would be more like France or perhaps Canada — less free — more socialist. Less “provincial.” As if we Americans are perfect. That we think we are so good. Better to just roll over all the way and be gutted like Venezuela. Well, screw you. Some of us tree-burners would rather stick a Prius up your ass and send you packing to Mexico. I know I would – if it was legal – or if you, say, broke my computer.

We know we are not perfect. Our Constitution is not perfect. My privates are not perfect. We are over-taxed. Too many people are in prison. But we still have our handguns. We can still hold our gold and silver. We haven’t had a serious terrorist incident in a long time. Perfect? No. But better? You think not? Then take your overfed American ass to Russia. Get on a bus – we are not stopping you – and haul ass to Canada – the land of free medical and taxes that will make you crap your panties – because all men in Canada wear panties – no balls.

The Greatest Country?

And I’m not saying the US is the greatest country on earth. It’s just the least screwed up. I’d move in a heart beat, if you can tell me about a single country where I can carry a handgun in public, am protected (hopefully) by nukes and an army, I can drive thousands of miles across country, with no “papers” and I can still choose a private doctor. And just maybe, I can see the day when Obamacare is repealed.

I’m waiting. Where is this awesome place? You know where it is? In Hollywood – at the movies. It’s in your Crack Dens’ and Meth Labs. It does not exist.

Where is this fairy tale place? Where everyone lives in harmony, never argues, pays low taxes, eats only vegetables, drinks fine wine, doesn’t need a gun, because there is no crime, ever? Where healthcare is free and bums never sleep in the gutters? Where terrorists don’t drive trucks into crowds of people? Where you are not told to shut your mouth, lest you anger the Ministry of Truth in modern day — Germany?  Wow. Hitler reborn.

The Objective

You see, I’m as opinionated as the next person, but I refrain from smearing. I have fun and I’m sure I will turn some of you off by my apparently Republican stance, but I’m not a Republican. I’m what is called an “Objectivist.” Have been since I was about 10, just after I found out about Santa Claus. And that really sucked. I mean, I really liked that guy and then the bomb drops. He was a fantasy. Never looked at another Christmas ornament the same way again, but the magic never left.

Since then, perhaps to the consternation of religious and socialists and anuses alike (they are all one and the same), I have required only one test to determine the solution to a problem: thinking. If you are unwilling to defend your idea, plum its core, face the music — however you define it — then go cry in the corner. Stand up and take it. No safe spaces. No free lunches. No crap.

A Capacity to Reason

Many of the bloggers about, do not exercise their capacity to reason and I am by no means an olympic challenger, but the quality of posts which fill the internet are much like the words hacked out of long dead soldiers. Until I can no longer peck away at these plastic keys, I will challenge, what I believe is philosophical garbage. Trash heaped high on the dead, with little respect for why or how they died.

Now, did our forefathers and grandfathers all die making us freer? Of course not. That’s not my point. Our world is not perfect. Many nations — many peoples — fought hard against despotism. Millions are buried and forgotten. Millions. So, if you talk trash, I’ll burn it. If you spew Nazi garbage or want a Ministry of Truth – you are garbage.

Any idea that heads us in that direction ought to be challenged. Ideas like having made a bad choice in the past and ending up in America — where you do not live on the backs of others as much as say, the Canadians. Regrets that other countries are better. F-ing leave, if you think that everyone must wear financial chains, so you can watch porn.

Why are you here…still?

Simple question. Why are you here? There are no fences keeping you in. And I wish that we did not have Social Security, so you would stop being the leeches you are. You have no right to force others to pay your way. There is no Social Security Trust Fund. There is no money. We are paying you directly — against our will. What is that called? It is called slavery. No, not physical chains, just financial ones. Which ones are more honest?

And why did you not save for your own retirement? When will dinosaurs like you become extinct? When will we be able to show our children your bones and point, “Yes, son, these were a people who were part of the Second Stage of Slavery — economic slavery — until they learned that all forms of slavery were wrong.” The little boy, about six, looks up, “boy dad, people were so stupid back then…”

The Words of War

This is the first area where wars are fought. Words. We have unleashed the war of ideas now, like Pandora’s box. Failure to respond to dead lies, is losing by default. Little by little the leeches win. The idea slavers win. Speak your mind. Screw them.

I say smack away at the misquotes of hate. Make them rue the day they found their way back from the swamps. If someone tells you, as an American (say some foolish Aussie and I know some smarter ones from down under) that human rights don’t exist, let loose the mouth of honesty. Oh, how the criminal minds hate that. How they beg you to stop the reality show. How they “delete” you rather the “debate” you. Castles in the sand. Reality, they say, is range of the moment. Cerebral bankruptcy.

And that’s the rub. Why do they — the bad bloggers on the net — wish to live off the labor of others — the backs of others? To exist in that law-of-the-jungle system, where the guy or gal with the most power wins? Where might, equals power over others? Then have the audacity to call it civilized?

They, the bloggers of low-think, use one of two techniques: Faith or force. Believe in God or Allah or the local deity [insert name here] or you are evil or misled. Force. Force everyone to bend to your will in order to create a fiefdom of serfs, lords and kings. The proverbial, ant pile.

Even bloggers are want of the history book and mind.

(Oh, and don’t blame government-public-schools — blame mother and father and yourself for not having the desire to know what the heck is going on around you. Crack a book. Turn on your ebook. Schools don’t make idiots, it’s the other way around.)

Have a nice F-ing night, pansies.

Jack Shorebird


 

Two’s Company, but Three Bitcoins?

 


Dear Readers,

If you have been keeping up with the news about bitcoin, being a crypto-enthusiast, no doubt you have read about NYA or the New York Agreement. It is yet another idea to change bitcoin. Ostensibly, to make it better.

Many feel that it will simply remove the original intent of Satoshi Nakamoto, but even this is a weak fintech argument. Nakamoto knew or could have imagined that if bitcoin became more popular, the necessary electricity to run the systems would increase exponentially. Did Nakamoto think that governments would then take over the operation?

Recently, Bitcoin Cash came onto the scene. It has garnered some support — in the billions of dollars — but there are still those who do not agree with the changes. Again, Bitcoin Cash, appears to favor large companies or governments since it requires more resources. In some respects, the economy of scale kicks in and prices — the cost of sending/receiving bitcoins — goes down.

But what of the other, long-term costs? The centralization aspect? The average citizen in 2009, could run bitcoin on his or her laptop.  Not now.

Now we have the NYA. Well, actually, it’s been around since at least May 23, 2017. The Digital Currency Group claims it has enough supporters to once again fork the bitcoin blockchain and create a new bitcoin. At that point, if it happens, the world would have three bitcoins — but not really. There are many bitcoin clones.

If the NYA succeeds, old bitcoin would probably devalue overnight. Bitcoin Cash might hold its own and compete, but looking at the support behind the NYA, it would probably fall from grace

So, what is happening? Are we still watching a power play unfold before our eyes? Sure we are. It’s about who can run the best bitcoin and bring in the most money. And who can make bitcoin the most efficient and essentially steal the thunder. Finally, it’s about brand. Name recognition. Competition.

With all the bitcoin clones running around out there, the first mover still holds sway. Even the tired, slow and sometimes buggy bitcoin, is trusted.  It just seems to keep growing. Yes, it pulls back, but then it usually recovers. Why? Trust.

But trust can only get you so far. If Bitcoin Core is divided or gives that appearance, we could see the world’s fastest devaluation. The question then becomes, who will remain standing?

Interestingly enough, and this is a good thing, there are new base-currencies in the cryptosphere. With a base-crypto you can purchase a sort of primary coin, then buy other altcoins. Should bitcoin suddenly fail, these others, such as Ethereum, Ripple and Dash, could, in theory, pick up the slack. Naturally, if bitcoin begins the fail, these other coins should increase in value, but usually they devalue when bitcoin does.

One wonders if the entire cryptosphere will survive, if bitcoin fails. But which one?

Add to this mix, the constant pressure by governments to rein bitcoin in. CNBC reported about China, Japan and now Australia. The impression appears to be that this newest push to regulate will ultimately lead to sort of a tacit acceptance by the people, as it were. In other words, if it’s regulated, well, it must be safe, right?

Unfortunately, government oversight, now gaining in popularity, as the volume of bitcoin transactions grow, will result in bitcoin’s original intent being subverted. It was designed as a stop-gap measure against government monetary policy. Ideally, and this is not to say that all proof-of-stake cryptocurrencies are poorly designed, but that would be a best choice. After all, governments need to be able to print unlimited numbers of ‘coins.’

I hate to admit it, but some other coins are starting to look better again. Remember, the excitement surrounding bitcoin could be irrational at the moment, fueled by speculators as well as good people. Who will get hurt, if the bubble bursts?

Maybe we should diversity our holdings.

Incidentally, if you like conspiracy theories, Clif High is still implying that silver can hit $600 an ounce. When? I’m not so certain, but if he is right, the value of gold will go down.

Disclaimer: The above, is all my opinion and/or provided from third parties. Make your own cold calculations.


 

 

 

Is Bitcoin in a Bubble?


The Big Question:

This seems to be the question of the day, if not the decade.

Can cryptocurrencies replace money or are they just another bubble?

The answers vary.

To the optimist, but not necessarily the realist, bitcoin is already money. So, yes, not only will it replace all government fiat cash, but it will free the masses from the tyranny of the state. It will never “bubble” and the way it’s designed, it will only become more valuable with time. Freedom for all forever and all the drugs you want. Gold? It’s a quaint idea. Caveman monetary policy, complete with pretty rocks.

Okay, maybe that was a bit overboard.

To the pessimist, no. Bitcoin is a Ponzi scheme. It is a well-marketed fiat asset trick. Don’t fall for it. It will eventually bubble, crash and burn. In the meantime, it will benefit the criminal element. It must go and/or be regulated as soon as possible. The state should always be the final arbiter of monetary policy, after all.

To the middle-of-the-road folks? Bitcoin can exist along side the current fiat money systems. It should work within the current frameworks of nationalized  monies, however. It can improve things from there. We can create a sound money standard after we iron out all of the regulatory kinks within the new cryptocurrency technology.

Unfortunately, our governments, as they are now designed, will not be able to survive on a diet of sound money and that is why fiat money was created in the first place. To escape the bonds of reality with a legal fiction, all the while, kicking the inflation can down the road.

But why not stop inflation by connecting bitcoin with gold? Make each one represent a certain amount of some rare earth metal? Why not couple gold and cryptocurrency, privately? Because the political environment is fiscally destructive. That’s why.

We know that our centrally planned economies will not allow citizens to derail the inflation machine which keeps our governments in control. It is only when the puppeteers begin to loose control of inflation that the money strings of government unravel, resulting in a revolution against the “evils of money.” Such revolutions do not always end up with a population of free citizens, however.

Cryptocurrency Negatives:

So, let us be cruel to ourselves. Take it on the chin, like a good cryptocurrency enthusiast should.

What is often cited as the main reason that bitcoin (or any cryptocurrency) can never serve as money? There are many reasons actually and here are a few:

  • Unstable Value
  • Trust
  • Fiat
  • Acceptance
  • Taxation
  • Bubble

Now, before we go off spouting all the great things about cryptocurrency, lets define money. I mean, what is this paper stuff we carry in out wallets and what are those electronically recorded digits in our banks? Better yet, let’s just define a good money.

Money:

  • A tool of humans
  • Used when high level of productivity is reached
  • Desire for long-range control over their lives
  • A tool of saving for delayed consumption and later production
  • A material commodity which is:
    • imperishable
    • rare
    • homogeneous
    • easily stored
    • not subject to wide fluctuations of value
    • always in demand among those you trade with

Source: Ayn Rand Lexicon

Few people ever go this deep, however. The dollar, euro, yen, dinar, peso, franc, pound, lira, rupee, krone, zloty, rand, and the shekel are, for all intents, legal notes. It’s money for the masses. Buts it’s not real money. It’s fiat money, which represents nothing but trust. I trust you, do you trust me? Besides, what choice do we have, right? It’s legal tender. It’s easier to use than chunks of silver, which the government wants to value in fiat anyway.

You can, at least in the US, pay your taxes with fiat currency and most of us trust that the currency is money.

We also know everything is becoming more expensive, but few of realize that the root cause of inflation is not the weather, the wealthy or our enemies. It’s simple math. The more fiat notes we print or e-print, the less valuable they become. This holds true for some cryptocurrencies as well. You simply divide the value, in fiat currency, by the current number of altcoins. This gives you a rough estimate of the fiat value of a particular cryptocurrency, at a given moment in time.

So, it’s easier to understand values with cryptocurrencies, since their creation is usually straight forward. There is no Federal Reserve to manipulate alleged M1, M2 and so on. There are no banks to create endless supplies of fiat. The only inflation regulators in bitcoin, for example, is its code base. It is currently programmed to create a finite number of BTC’s. It’s not manipulated to screw the masses, but to retain its spending value.

Paper money used to represent or hold title to gold or silver. That was why it worked. Why it functioned. Once the paper no longer held title to some form of property, it became fiat. It became dysfunctional. At that point, almost always, economies begin their decline. Some economies decline faster than others of course.

Perhaps if our governments set hard long-term limits on fiat numbers, then our fiat monies might stand a chance. But there are no such limits.

High Hopes:

Many hoped that bitcoin could save our failing economies, tame our ever growing governments, and usher in some new global paradigm of wealth, but not without effort.  If this is your thinking, you are guilty of being overly optimistic and just maybe, a bit naive. Don’t worry, I’m rooting for you because I’m a near-convert myself.

What holds us back from becoming “one with the crypto?” History. It is full of examples of ledger based monetary systems that ultimately failed. It is replete with evidence that all of the fiat based systems failed as well. And the gold-backed systems — failed, but after the decoupling of functional money (paper notes) from the metals. The governments enforced these failures, often by confiscating the one form of money that has never become valueless: gold.

So we have to ask ourselves why have all monetary systems failed throughout history? Now, I’m not asserting that gold became worthless–ever. Fiats did. Ledger systems were scrapped or forced out. Seashells were abandoned. But not a single monetary system transcended all governments, in any cohesive fashion. Bitcoin, though an asset, does.

Asked another way. Aside from gold and silver being an asset for thousands of years, what monetary system, fiat or otherwise, has ever existed beyond the constructive control of all governments, simultaneously?

Bitcoin as an Asset:

The latest thinking is that bitcoin (cryptocurrency) is not money, but acts as like an asset. That is Peter Schiff’s thinking. Schiff works with Goldmoney Inc., based in Canada and he lives in Puerto Rico. Goldmoney(tm) is a company that allows you to spend gold, via a debit card, in many countries, for a small fee. You can also store gold in various vaults around the word. And there are other benefits.

You can find out about more about Schiff’s views easily. He has his a radio show, owns several companies, is an author, but to sum up his financial views I would offer this:

He has repeatedly held bullish views on long-term investments in foreign stocks and currencies in countries with sound fiscal and monetary policies, as well as global commodities including physical precious metals and has expressed bearish views on the US economy and the US dollar.

Source: Wikipedia

So what is an asset?

An asset is anything of value that can be converted into cash.

Source: Investopedia

It’s a bit more complicated than this, but for the sake of argument, all cryptocurrencies are assets, since conversions to some other form of trusted money is the fundamental purpose to both buy and hold bitcoins. I mean, that is the allegation, right? Moreover, as Schiff asserts, companies that accept bitcoin in payment for services or products, ultimately convert it to either fiat currency or some other more trusted asset. Sure they do. After all, what real choice do they have? None.

In other words, the companies that will accept your bitcoins direclty just want to sell you stuff. Of course they do and they are held to the regulations requiring them to report their earnings in a nationalized fiat currency format. A government euro. A dollar. One wonders what would happen if companies and citizens were not required to convert to government fiat money? If they were actually free to use the asset of their choosing for all debts, public and private.

But we are not free in this sense. Not completely.

You Must Comply:

Are we to then shrug and comply? I don’t think so. The future is not made by those in the halls of government. That is not the purpose of government. They are present simply to protect and serve the people. They are peace keepers, not currency makers. Currency and money should be denationalized anyway. Things like bitcoin serve as a reminder of who should be in charge. Even if it fails. Even if it is a bubble.

Under the current circumstances, bitcoin, as asserted by Peter Schiff, is untraceable. This, I’m afraid is close, but not the complete cigar. All bitcoin transactions are public. You can see them zip around the network, but they can be obfuscated for privacy and criminal reasons. And your name is not attached to your account. Other cryptocurrencies are much better at retaining your privacy.

A Common Criminal:

Naturally, Schiff keys in on the criminal aspect. We’ve all heard it. A terrorist or crook will send his bitcoin, instead of carrying cash. At some point the bitcoin will be converted into cash to buy or sell something illegal.

One of the main problems with this criminal tactic are the fluctuations in bitcoin prices. The criminal might have a set price for his product and bitcoin is terrible for that reason. Perhaps it would be better to use what is called Tether ™. It’s a bank backed cryptocurrency that is almost pegged at the US dollar. Better yet, use paper dollars or digital fiats. That’s the routine.

I used to work in criminal justice field, just a few years ago. We rarely came across evidence of cryptocurrency use. Maybe it’s more prevalent now. What we did come across were stolen credit cards, emailed cash, fiat bill, drugs, debit card numbers and so on. Criminals wanted dollars just as fast as they could get them. Not gold or silver coins, but paper fiats. They used the banking system and filed false IRS refunds (very lucrative since the IRS does a terrible job of policing their own refund system) as a way to easily subvert the antiquated, government regulated, fiat monetary system.

This is not to say that cryptocurrency is immune to criminal exploitation, but cash is king — by law. And even criminals love to exploit that law. Some even print their own bills. This is next to impossible with bitcoin.

Bubbles:

The comparison of cryptocurrencies to the Dot-com bubble is also interesting, but old. The idea that investing in cryptocurrency is similar to a fad or is speculative, is certainly a strong argument, however. More and more people are becoming aware of the technology and as a result, more money is flowing in. Is this a new opportunity for those who are already versed in their use and speculation? Sure it is. The first comers are on top of that pyramid, right? But can’t this also be said of a new stock? The more people buy the faster the value of the stock increases, right?

One must realize, however, that as cryptocurrencies become more and more popular, they become more and more risky. They are not stocks. There are few barriers to entry and trades are nearly instant. There are few restrictions. You are free to lose and gain and panic. At least with stocks, you have a broker who earns very high commissions by comparison, and you can execute trades reasonably quickly, in most cases. Oh, and you have no privacy. Every transaction is logged for tax and regulatory purposes, to ensure that you are not being cheated. That never happens…

This new injection of funds into the cryptosphere, ostensibly from a broader base — regular people — and not simply from the brokerage houses that fueled the Dot-coms, serves to magnify the potential bubble. This is a given. If such a bubble bursts, the fallout could eclipse a standard market collapse…in the future. Not right now though. Which is why the heat is not all that hot.

Currently, the amount of money in the cryptocurrency system is peanuts compared to the banking sector. Sure, lawsuits and investigations happened after the Dot-coms, the housing bubble — after any number of market implosions. Bailouts are always an option for government to soften the blow of poor investment decisions. But when banks collapse, governments step in and the insurers pay up. Then the arrests come. Fines and Senate Hearings, when the circus comes to town.

Brokerage houses are known entities. The mortgage companies and banks are all around us. If bitcoin fails, the loss is real. It will hurt millions, but in the scheme of things, it will be very small. Currently, if all the cryptocurrencies listed on coinmarketcap here went to zero overnight, it would only be half as bad as the Washington Mutual insolvency in 2008. One bank compared to over 1000 cryptocurrencies.

Diversification:

Diversification may not help. One might be safer with a mutual fund or an ETF but not a cryptocurrency. Why? Because there are few, what I will call base-cryptocurrencies, bitcoin being one. When bitcoin drops in value, nearly all cryptocurrencies lose value. So, loses are often magnified. When bitcoin recovers, so do the others. Tether cryptocurrency is one exception. It usually hovers around one US dollar in value, but it has little upside. Conversely, if say Ripple (tm) devalues, bitcoin may not.

The tie-in with bitcoin and all other cryptocurrencies happens because it was a first comer and trusted. If you want other cryptocurrencies you will often need to trade for them using your bitcoin. If you want to convert back to fiat, it is often best to use bitcoin. This is changing, however. Other coins are slowly earning a type of base-currency status.

Anti-Money:

The Fallout:

What do you suspect will happen to the hundreds of international cryptocurrency market exchanges, when (and if) the bubble bursts? Do we even know where they are? How about the US based exchanges? Will their doors be closed, their assets frozen? Will your bitcoins be stuck in Europe or Asia? Will you keep your BTC at home on your hard-drive or some other device. Will cryptocurrency developers in the US then be shuffled off to prison?

How about the giant bitcoin mining farms in China and the world over? Shut off? Scrapped? Bitcoins Confiscated? What about the cryptocurrencies that do not use the ‘farms?’ The ones like Peercoin ™, which is essentially PC based?

What of the decentralized cryptocurrency exchanges that exist only between you an unknown parties over the internet? Will these applications be shut down and their unknown creators sought?

The fact that Amazon ™ lost 90% of it’s stock value over as many years, as Schiff indicated, is his example of what can happen to bitcoin. The nearly constant ICO’s (Initial Coin Offerings), the new cryptocurrencies popping up like so much graffiti, will not survive, even if they use the latest blockchain technology or some variant of it. There will be a saturation point, no doubt. Already, there is talk that if you are in “blockchain” (your company invests or develops this type of new tech) you don’t make any money.

Some companies can exist in the red for years, but at some point they must turn a profit or fail. The only other option is to ask for a loan. In any event, even Amazon ™ has not failed, but it has real products as well as software. (Bitcoin is software. An intangible asset.)

The Beginning of the End?

Flipping houses before the market imploded was all the rage before 2007. It still happens today, in Florida, where I live, but not nearly at the pace of a decade earlier. When friends quit their jobs back then, bought huge homes, new cars and lived the life, only to be financially destroyed later, it was rough. The house flippers paid the price. After the building boom things slowed and housing prices dropped. We can argue all day about how and why the crisis began. One thing is certain, however, irrational exuberance was the norm.

Is that beginning to happen with cryptocurrencies now? In a sense, flipping cryptocurrencies doesn’t really happen. You can’t buy one, improve it, unless you are the developer, sell it and walk away. You can however, buy one at the bottom, when it’s cheap, then trade it for bitcoin or Tether, when it increases in value. Unfortunately, the tax headaches in some countries makes this type of arbitrage unprofitable. If you ignore the taxes, you are chancing fines or worse.

But what of the P/E Ration? I mean, we can calculate the price to earnings ratio of a stock, but how would you do that with bitcoin? Can we ever know when and if it is overvalued? We can see when underlying government fiat money is devaluing by comparing it to something like gold. When more fiat buys less gold we have inflation or more correctly, currency devaluation. When less bitcoin buys more fiat dollars, what is occurring? Is bitcoin becoming more popular or is it acting like gold? Is it becoming like a peoples’ barometer of their own fiat money — worldwide?

The Aftermath?

After this cryptocurrency bubble bursts, if it does, what might remain? Cryptocurrencies which offer a type of service, like Ethereum ™? Ones that offer fiat trading via third parties, and other services, like Stellar ™? Newer models, such as Iota ™ or Neo ™? It’s your guess.

Worse case? Your country outlaws innovation or co-ops it, then slowly destroys it.

The best case scenario, for now? Bitcoin keeps growing and more nationalized fiat  currencies fail. The cryptosphere becomes indispensable, trusted by people everywhere, and nations begin to compete by adopting sound monetary policies.

In the meantime, don’t fall for the hype. Do your homework if you are curious about cryptocurrencies.

And a parting thought. At some point, technology will be able to create physical items upon demand. If we are then able to create gold by recombining atoms and molecules, an abundant resource nearly everywhere where we look, on the cheap, how will we then design a voluntary, sound monetary system?

 

Good Day,

Jack Shorebird.


 

 

Clif High: “The Charlatan”

Updated: September 19, 2017


Hello, crypto enthusiasts. Thanks for stopping by.

As usual, I’ve been scanning the net for the scoops. Watching the crypto-markets for the fizz and pop. And here’s the latest curiosity I’ve managed to dig up from the fintech ether.

And mind you, the people (person) I may cite herein may not have one of the cleanest resumes, but damned if he doesn’t get your spaz juices flowing.

He’s sort of like a preacher. Magnetic personality, but a bit high and mighty. That should warn you.

The personality I speak of is Clif High. And he’s a bit of a, how can I say this nicely — an unusual chap? But I’m not one for killing the messenger, even if he is a bit burnt, if you catch my drift. Actually, he is way past unusual and often his predictions are way off the mark.

And yet, he has a cult-like following. That should warn you — I repeat.

That’s why I’ve been chomping at the bit. Kind of mulling this whole thing over for months. Trying to align my belief in a gold backed (silver backed) monetary system with the alleged future facts (and ideas) Clif High is constantly bringing to the table.

Clif’s detractors are all over the spectrum, but many are simply fuming.

Years of $600 an ounce silver predictions, that have never materialized.

But I can’t really do it justice and I do not work for Clif. Don’t know him from Adam, as it were. Yet, the guy is able to explain, in words and ideas — in a few seconds — in a way that resonates with the listener.

  • Bitcoin (cryptocurrency) may, within the next 10 to 20 years, undo thousands of years of stagnant and centralized money control
  • This new world of crpyto can serve as a shot-in-the-arm for economies, for wealth, technological development and so on

But his often oblique remarks to explain why this is, are rather wanting. For example, why can bitcoin (or a particular cryptocurrency) succeed? Here’s what Clif implied:

  • The U.S. split from Great Britain when about 3% of the people wanted it
  • Only about 1% or less of people, now want bitcoin or cryptocurrency
  • If this margin reaches 10%, the governments of the world, which are always behind the times, will be unable to stop it

That, the iron is heating up and you may be able to make some serious cash, if you invest soon. That’s my crypto-take, but be careful of the pumpers. Clif has been accused of being a pumper many times.

These are very positive statements in a lot of ways, in my book. But based on zero facts, unless one considers a Webbot and ESP as factual.

Why does Clif seem to ignore the implications of the PBoC (People’s Bank of China)? They have been waffling for years, but recently they’ve turned over an accusatory leaf. Crypto is a financial threat, they say.

The suggestion here, and not only from me, is that Clif High or who ever he is — is a fraud. That he sells bunk and snake-oil to the hopeful people. That he mixes fact and fiction so well, the facts tend to lend him a sort of a credibility.

So we listen. Anti-gravity forklifts. They are coming.

Turkey will unleash a global financial meltdown, very soon.

Major earthquakes were suppose to have diverted rivers in North America and precipitated nuclear meltdowns in August of 2017. (Whoops, on that prediction.)

We listen to Clif’s hollow-moon babble. Just believe.

And we trust that just maybe he’s onto something about crypto’s? Swamp-land anyone?

Maybe, if you buy his reports, you’ll make millions. He appears to be rich, right? Have you seen any pictures or videos of his home(s)? His camper? His rented cabin(s)?

Maybe his Webbot thing was garbled by bad data like he said, which is why he currently focuses on cryptocurrency. Suspicious, don’t you think?

Wild and woolly nonsense. The lot of it.

I hope that Clif’s inexplicable descriptions, his references to the unusual and seemingly unproven, are not, in some ways, infecting his ability to maintain his rationality. But one needs to be rational in the first place.

As far as I can see, his “predictions” have raised eyebrows for several years now. But are his prognostications simply too general? Too crazy? Do you really need to ask yourself that question?

And his alleged Webbot? Where is it? In his brain? It’s not “open source.”

And yes, there are other experiments like the Webbot, predictive markets, and the wisdom of the crowd ideas. Estimations based upon predictions are akin to gambling, however. It is not like life a life insurance actuarial table predicting deaths per thousand, based on past data.

Clif talks about silver prices skyrocketing — for a time — constantly. This is not something new. Given the devaluation of fiat currencies worldwide, this scenario is possible, but is it probable? Could anyone with the ability to read and understand basic economics, also make this observation?

Gold is just sort of okay, as far I can judge by Clif’s statements. However, he’s not too enthusiastic about it.

New tech that will create matter from energy is only a few years away, Clif implies. So why mine gold or silver in say, 15 years — anyway? If we will be able to manufacture gold and silver with relative ease, why invest in any metal?

Potential limited nuclear wars are on the horizon. Really? Is anyone not worried that North Korea or some other rogue nation might push the button?

But by and large, the outlook is very positive, in Clif’s assessments? Really?

How can anyone be happy about earthquakes, nuclear bombs, market crashes and hollow-moons? One cannot — unless what? Unless one is not telling the truth. Unless one has created a  “Webbot” of lies.

Clif has apparently spoken about of Cloakcoin. Is he pumping it? Is he using his “cult following” to make money by influencing the crpyto-markets? That is the allegation. In fact, if you check Clif’s past, some have alleged that he has been practicing “pumping” for years.

Please — you be the judge. Give this guy a listen. Tell me that he does not, in some weird way, make you very positive about the future of our world and at the same time, make you feel that hell is about to be unleashed.

You’d better listen in and buy his reports to survive and profit — so he can. I think the reports are about $100.00 (US) each now. There are complaints about those too. Irrational babble.

Here’s a recent talk. It’s long — a YouTube interview with Clif.

The Interview.

Here’s a rebuttal video. It’s a bit abrasive.

Rebuttal.

Conclusion and my prediction without using a Webbot:

Clif’s popularity will remain among the wingnuts, but based on his continued irrational statements, the vast and silent majority, will begin to ignore his rants.

Clif has recently stopped posting his own videos, choosing instead to be interviewed. It is an effort to stop others from allegedly taking soundbites from his videos and twisting the message. Or is it something else? Perhaps pressure from video providers to stop reporting “fake news.”

Even his recent remarks about Carbon 60 consumption has been debunked by others.

And Clif mentioned that his brother had Schizotypal Personality Disorder.

Enough said.

Follow Clif at your own risk.