Cryptocurrency Fake-News, ZeroHedge, Clif High and other Palm Readers


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Dear Crypto-Readers,

There are two places on the net where cryptocurrency and other information is highly suspect.

Use these sites and people, at your own risk.

They are:

  • Clif High
  • ZeroHedge

Coming from an investigative background, the fact that this “fake news” spills over into the cryptocurrency environment, is not news. The news is the reliance by some bloggers and hidden “news” sites, upon questionable sources. In fact, even legitimate organizations sometimes cite questionable sources.

Why?

Sensationalism?

Click-baiting?

You bet. It’s all about the ad revenue. Even I like that. Last month, I took my wife to dinner with the money I made on this blog. Thanks readers.

But first, before ZeroHedge (I will not link to this site due to security risks) I want to bring up an internet personality. I have mentioned him before: Clif High. (I’ve linked to a previous piece I wrote about him.)

Suffice to say, Clif High appears to sell conspiracy theories, based upon his belief in ESP. He is the silver-tongued devil of the future, that never quite materializes. He makes blatantly false predictions and it’s a wonder people continue to support him. It’s curiosity, he’s fun to watch, but also morbidly interesting. 

As an investigator for several decades, I had the opportunity to interview/interrogate thousands of criminally insane people. For these reasons, I sometimes watch Clif High. I’m not saying the guy is insane, I’m not a doctor. However, Clif sure leaves that door wide open. And, I’m guilty — I still watch him.

But Clif High, even if that is a pseudonym, puts his face to the music. Maybe he likes the attention – the fame. Many folks with that burning desire to be recognized, live fruitful, public lives. They are entertainers, in a sense. And we pay to be entertained. Of course, he has his diehard cult following. So be it. At least his detractors can lambast him – publicly. And Clif dishes it back out. At least Clif has the guts to stand in the limelight, be it the laser of truth or his ever-changing contrarian view of the near future.

And you have to respect old Clif’s tenacity.

Then there is the dark side. The shadow conspiracies. The quasi-blogs and secret “.orgs” plying their trade. Is it real or is it fluff?

Aside from the accusations against Clif High (see link above and read reader comments) at least he’s not hiding like ZeroHedge. Those people publish and hide so completely, that every word they type, is suspect. Sure, we know that anonymous reporters can uncover information, but at some point, the information can be verified. Not at ZeroHedge. At least not most of it.

For all of Clif High’s odd beliefs, he has on occasion, chowed down on ICO altcoins, torn them asunder and spat out a decent review.  I wish he’d take after ZeroHedge.

I used to read ZeroHedge. It’s fun. A sort of Dredge-the-Bottom Report. Occasionally, it puts you on a trail of something good. Something interesting. However, after the site was probably hacked I refused to visit. In fact, in a sense, it is unethical for anyone to hide a link in their blog, to a potentially risky site and not advise readers of same.

What do I mean?

Legitimate bloggers should choose to protect, as much as possible, their readers’ digital security. If there is even a hint that a website is hacked, has an unknown or hidden location, is based in a risky country, has owners from risky countries or in any way makes them suspicious, then they should not link to the site.

Am I perfect? No. Could I make a mistake and cite a source from a website that is spinning its news? Sure. Usually, I let you know if I think the source is off the mark, however. And if the “writer” uses a pseudonym, like me, no problem. If you cite legitimate sources, you’re golden. Hell, many reporters and writers have dozens of handles.

But Tyler Durden? The Wikipedia entry about ZeroHedge, should make anyone sit up and take notice:

“Zero Hedge’s content has been classified as “alt-right,” anti-establishment, conspiratorial, and economically pessimistic, and has been criticized for presenting extreme and sometimes pro-Russian views.”

Not only should the pro-Russian views clue us in, but the “conspiracy” classification is on par with Clif High’s antics. Take both sources cum grano salis – with a grain of salt. And take Wikipedia itself with a grain of salt. Check their sources as well.

According to Business Insider, at least one of three men suspected of working/writing for ZeroHedge, a Bulgarian by the name of Daniel Ivandjiiski, was “kicked out of the securities industry during the height of the financial crisis in 2008 for insider trading.”

Another suspect ZeroHedge man, Colin Lokey, may be:

“…an emotionally unstable, psychologically troubled alcoholic with a drug dealer past…”

Tim Backshall, a 45-year-old credit derivatives strategist is another suspected writer for the conspiratorial newsletter-blog. This @credittrader appears to be his Twitter account. His listed website is capitalcontext.com. You guessed it all hidden info. And his tweets are full of ZeroHedge charts. Curious.

There was also a hint that Colin Lokey used or invented the Daniel Ivandjiiski and Tim Blackshall names.

But ZeroHedge does not always post unsubstantiated or bogus news. In fact, they have been accused of outright plagiarism. Lifting or citing other stories that they could then blend into their narrative. Generally, it’s a pessimistic view of world finance and politics, and the environment. One sided. On the other hand, their stories are often hard-hitting, provocative and full of charts. Just don’t go checking their sources. You’ll find that the numbers don’t always jive. Some have accused ZeroHedge of 90% lies, 10% questionable facts.

In any event, before you visit ZeroHedge do a little research. A little Scamadviser checking and internet backstory reads. Here’s what I found. I added to the already growing number of concerns about ZeroHedge as well.


Four Risks of ZeroHedge


Risk #1 – You are being Hacked

Let us start with this. Did you know that every time you visit the ZeroHedge website to read a blog, you may be risking your digital health? The website may be hacked. This alone, if you are serious about keeping your money and identity safe, should be enough. But let us add fuel to the fire.


Risk #2 – Mystery Website

Each time you visit the ZeroHedge website, from where are those bits and bytes flowing? The origin country? Well, there is a good chance you are reading a Canadian alt-right website or maybe you are pulling data straight from the US or the UK, but the fact is, the location of the ZeroHedge website is unknown. It could just as easily be in Moscow.


Risk #3 – Mystery Owner(s)

Who owns the ZeroHedge Website or company? Well, not Tyler Durden. That’s just comedy. The fact is, the owner’s identity is unknown.

There are only a few good reasons to remain anonymous. You are divulging legitimate secrets and you are concerned about your safety. You are lying like hell and are also concerned about your safety. There are other reasons to remain hidden as well, including using the anonymous angle to make others think you are a “deep throat” and not a run-of-the-mill click-baiter. To make money from the advertisers is another great reason to create and use the anonymous mystique.


Risk #4 – Bad Actors?

Although there is no “guilt by association,” unless the strings connect, an associated business service/address is ABCMedia 300A-219 Dufferin St. Toronto M6K 3J1. They are the web service for ZeroHedge.

Here is a google map of that location, in Canada.

The actual name of the service is easyDNS Technologies, Inc. They are known to be associated with Wikileaks, according to this Wikipedia entry. The company owner’s name and country is hidden, but it could be Mark Jeftovic. The website location is also uncertain.

Here is Mark Jeftovic’s Twitter account…easyDNS CEO. Libertarian. Contrarian. Bookish. The “E” stands for “easy,” as it states on Twitter. He is a known blogger (curious) in the ZeroHedge vein, on Markable.com. That’s a potentially risky website, hence no link. Suffice to say, it’s almost like reading “early” ZeroHedge.

The Markable.com address is listed as 67 Mowat Ave, Toronto, ON, M6K 3E3. That is here. It’s the Toronto Carpet Factory. If you notice, it’s adjacent to the Dufferin Street address of ABC Media.

If you look, you will also see another website listed on Jeftovic’s twitter account: guerrilla-capitalism.com. The name speaks for itself. It’s a newer hidden website, with a hidden owner in a secret country. Its listed address, you guessed it, Dufferin Street. Try 304A-219 Dufferin Street, Toronto, M6K 3J1 to be exact.

There is other curious news about EasyDNS as well.

According to The Register (United Kingdom) in a 2013 article titled “Canadian operator EasyDNS stands firm against London cops.” The Police’s Intellectual Property Crime Unit requested the EasyDNS take down websites selling pirated music/movies. EasyDNS refused. Did they support crime? Seems that way.

When you compare ZeroHedge’s “use” of copyrighted materials, to EasyDNS allowing hosted sites to profit on pirated content, things appear to shift alt-right, in tandem.

Furthermore, from Wikipedia in 2014, “…CEO Mark Jeftovic referred to the National Association of Boards of Pharmacy as a “batch of clowns” after it sent EasyDNS and other registrars a document issuing guidelines on when to take down domains of suspected “rogue” pharmacies without court orders. The memo included instructions which would put registrars in violation of their ICANN Registrar Accreditation Agreements.”

What happened? Death.

“Some months later EasyDNS modified its takedown policy after a man died after taking a “controlled substance” codeine phosphate purchased without a prescription from airmailchemist.com, an online drug seller registered through easyDNS Technologies Inc. EasyDNS was not aware of airmailchemist.com’s presence on their system, or the fatality until they were contacted by a Wall Street Journal reporter investigating ICANNs policies on unlicensed pharmacies. ICANN had not notified EasyDNS of either the FDA complaint nor the fatality. Once informed, EasyDNS initiated contact with the FDA and the domain was immediately taken down. EasyDNS now requires online pharmacies to provide proof that they are licensed.”

Another source of Jeftovic’s blogs is Medium.com. Again, I won’t link to that site since there have been reports of hacking there as well.

 


Conclusion:


In conclusion, the websites and names associated with ZeroHedge are fishy, to say the least. The site itself, may have been hacked, putting any visitor’s digital information at risk — and this includes bank accounts. The hosting service (easyDNS Technologies Inc.) for ZeroHedge may have and may still be, assisting criminals — the ones who steal digital information. The name/owner associated with the hosting service are also associated with websites and are hosted in unknown countries. The hosting service in question is associated with WikiLeaks and could simply be a mouthpiece for them…and WikiLeaks has been known to compromise identities, to include medical information and social security numbers of individuals —  per this Wikipedia entry.

But you be the judge. Buy/sell cryptocurrency or stocks, based on ZeroHedge’s advice and see what happens.

Or use common sense.

Personally, I don’t think the current “correction” in cryptocurrency is a correction at all. This stuff is outside of the normal channels. It sings to its own tune. That tune, in my thinking, is you.

Choose the dying fiat “reality” or choose — just a little — freedom cryptocurrency. But remember, both exist.


 

 — JGS

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2 thoughts on “Cryptocurrency Fake-News, ZeroHedge, Clif High and other Palm Readers

  1. I have always felt that Richard Lathwell aka Clif High has an interest in ZeroHedge. I am pretty confident that he took over the Godlike Productions Forum around 2009 or thereabouts. I noted the change in format of the forum. All of a sudden there was advertising on it, Canadian advertising whereas before there was none. It’s all about the money ….. Richard/Clif was in my opinion the moderator called SHR. I’ve never been back there since he took over. Not a good place….

    PS I SENT A PERSONAL EMAIL TODAY TO YOU, DID YOU RECEIVE IT.

    Like

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