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Bytecoin: The Cryptopia Delist

Bytecoin: The Cryptopia Delist

Why did the Cryptopia cryptocurrency exchange choose to delist Bytecoin (BCN), even after it surged in recent weeks? Don’t let the above picture give you any ideas. I am not saying that Cryptopia has a large stash of BCN and they are making off with it — since they can’t find the rightful owners. After all, abandoned property means “finders keepers” in the crypto-world, right?

The official explanation is:

Delist Notice – BCN

Due to an on-going issue of deposits being sent to Cryptopia without payment id, resulting in long delays for users or loss of coins, BCN is being delisted. Please withdrawal your BCN before 20/09/17

Published by: DaRoll @ 8/20/2017 11:30:01 AM

Okay, but that doesn’t seem rational. Many other CryptoNote based coins use the same method of depositing. They require a payment “ID” in addition to an address.

Boolberry (another CryptoNote derivative) is also being delisted at Cryptopia.

But what about Monero (XMR)? Will they be next on the chopping block? If Bytecoin deposits were creating a problem, would not Monero deposits create similar issues? Are Monero users savvier or is it simply a more trusted coin? I don’t think so. Even the Cryptopia blog/forum has threads from people having similar problems.

According to Cryptopia’s own policy, coins can be relisted, after having been delisted,

…provided the issue that was the reason for delisting has been addressed and the network can be synced.

The policy also states that “coins may face delisting” for several reasons:

  • Sufficient nodes are not maintained to keep the network synced and moving
  • A coinswap
  • Any network issues or bugs that could result in loss of user funds
  • Statements made by a coin or coin community that could bring the reputation of Cryptoipa [sic] into disrepute.

And there is a primary reason cryptocurrency exchanges are in business: money. If they cannot earn enough money, they shut down. If Bytecoin is a problem coin, it becomes a money drain. Based upon the official Cryptopia forum statement (above) Bytecoin is problematic for them.

Could the Cryptopia folks design their systems to assist BCN customers? Maybe. But why should they, if other coins are more profitable, more in demand, long term, and easier to deal with?

Will Cryptopia anger the BCN customer base by their actions, like Poloniex did? We know, after some months, Poloniex finally relisted BCN. So, why then, did Cryptopia delist now?

Clearly, there is something, besides the payment “ID” issue that is bothering Cryptopia. That is my opinion, but I’d sure like to have a fly on the wall at Cryptopia, after the recent Poloniex debacle.

There are the “sour grapes” folks as well. From Reddit:

BYTEcoin being Delisted on Cryptopia (self.BytecoinBCN)

submitted 12 hours ago by RightwayNZ: As of now you can no longer buy and sell BCN on www.cryptopia.co.nz; Not sure why because they stock a lot [sic] of sh*tcoins and I wouldn’t classify BCN as a “Sh*t coin”

[–]JR_216 3 points 11 hours ago: Old news. Cryptopia is kind of a sh*tty exchange as well. The community didn’t seem to care much when this was announced a couple weeks ago.

[–]Franzferdinan51 2 points 11 hours ago: Sh*t dumb move on their part

[–]propagandapalace 1 point 9 hours ago: Cryptopia has more currency and crypto pairings than any other exchange I can think of, but low volume, crappy customer service, and “dumb decisions” like this one, are why most people steer clear of it… They will come to regret letting BCN go…

Not all is well at Cryptopia, it seems. Bitcointalk.org has had a fair share of complaints from folks indicating that responses from the staff at Cryptopia were taking over a month. This does not bode well from a rather small exchange (by comparison) in New Zealand. Perhaps the best way to rid themselves of this negative community press, was to delist and seek the easy-to-use coins. Too much business too fast.

Is this what prompted the delistings of late?

Our team is proud to announce that we have launched full support for Cryptopia on Coinigy. While Cryptopia’s charts were already available on the platform, users can now attach API keys to track portfolio balances and trade through Coinigy.

The above is from here. Information that, as of August 12, 2017, Cryptopia was getting a new pal from America. Three days later Boolberry is delisted. Eight days later the announcement that BCN was out.

What does Coinigy do? It allows trading by customers over multiple exchanges at once. Great idea, right? So, what is the drawback? What problems might a New Zealand exchange have with an American company?

For one, compliance. All American companies must comply with related regulations from multiple agencies requiring the identification of coin holders.  Bytecoin’s main purpose is privacy. It is probably impossible to trace Bytecoin deposits and transfers, unless the coin holders supply that information.

If this is correct and Cryptopia is trying to put on a better face, they might soon abandon any coin allowing the level of security and privacy Bytecoin affords. Meaning Monero might be next. Coinigy could then be relied upon to handle the phone calls, texts, emails and complaints? Is Cryptopia hiring a well polished front man? You know, so they can concentrate on their main business.

If we can extrapolate from here, the movement from public coins, like bitcoin, to private coins with anonymous developers, like Bytecoin and Monero, answerable to no one – the centralized exchanges might need to comply with the ever-increasing pressure from the authorities to know their customers. We live in a “terrorist world,” after all and everyone is a suspect.

One option, if the private and secure cryptocurrencies are shunted off to the less trustworthy decentralized exchanges or the “wild west” of crypto-land, would be the adoption, by some country with strict privacy laws, of a cryptocurrency freedom code.

Although, there have been several attempts to utilize a cryptocurrency as money (currency) in various countries, these monies are tracked and regulated. China, that bastion of freedom, is allegedly preparing to launch a national cryptocurrency. This is just one example, but suffice to say, governments want to track your money and with public cryptocurrencies like bitcoin, it’s not a problem.

If regulators push the secure and private cryptos (Bytecoin, Monero, Aeon, Nav Coin etc.) into the black markets, they may be surprised when their values begin to soar. Not only might they create a wealthy criminal class, but solidify a crypto-substrate that will undoubtedly be used against them. Such a class of people the world might be better off without, if only the regulators allow us the freedom to manage and create our own currencies with no interference or spying on the innocents.

But this is a dream from a future century.


Note: There is more information about the Cryptopia BCN delist in my blog titled “Poloniex v. Cryptopia.”

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