The Crypto Papers

Common sense reviews about cryptocurrencies and related issues

Bytecoin: The DStrange Con?


Money Drain

Money Drain

If you need to boost your customer base, sell more goods — more crypto — what do you do? Hire a “PR” guy, right? Or pretend to hire one. I mean, on the internet one can create any number of what are called “sock puppet” accounts. Additional emails and user names for various social networking websites to make it appear as if many people are behind the scenes — hiding in the deep dark web — working hard to make things happen.

A bit of Bytecoin history that might be fiction is in order to help us understand the Bytecoin outlook. A short re-hash. In any event, in makes for a good story. The personalities in this space are colorful, but think of cardboard cutouts. Think of characters in a book — a book of fiction. Think about keeping your money while you are at it. Even if the Chinese own Bitcoin, maybe you’d better just wait and see.

I have often wondered what it is that has brought me here to the Bytecoin.org doorstep. It’s the mystery of course. The not knowing. It bothers me. And maybe that’s the lure or the pull, if you will. Is it a marketing method? No, I doubt that. I doubt that all of the mystery surrounding Bytecoin is meant to make us feel protected — secure in our monies. Our crypto. No matter how great the code may be, there are simply too many red flags to ignore.

The mystery is what it is. A lack of information which has led to multiple inquires going back since at least 2012. Now ask yourself what kind of people do not want you to obtain information about them? Are they the crypto-saviors or just the opposite? Scammers — criminals — or at the very least unethical developers bent on fast profits and a slow exit?

The point is, when some of us smell a rat or a bunch of them — even if they are living in a palace of fantastic code-cheese (that’s a slight reference to “Cheesus” — a mod on the Bytecoin Forum as well as BitcoinTalk) — well, we investigate. And I may have praised certain aspects of BCN in the past, but now is the season — once again — to hunt. To hunt and to make crypto-enthusiasts aware that scammers are alive and feasting — have been — for years in this Wild West environment. An environment where cheap cryptos entice the buyers, who only later discover that the shear number of BCN coins prevents any giant pumps. And that is just as well, since quick profits are just as easy to come by as quick losses.

Take DStrange. A character. A fiction? Yet another pseudonymous ghost. A Bytecoin promoter — who rarely promotes. You’ll find him listed under the Teto-Team at Bytecoin.org. He is a recent member, allegedly. Meaning he came after the rest of them. If you peruse the Bitcointalk forums you will find a trove of information which dovetails with the Bytecoin developers, going back to 2014. You will find argument after argument, accusations fly — and always the Bytecoin Team loses. DStrange loses. Rias loses. Cheesus loses. They are never able to explain why they — or Bytecoin — chose certain “dark” paths. Why Bytecoin essentially made the lion’s share of the coins for themselves, under optimal conditions.

Why is DStrange so curious, however? Because few people have ever had any contact with the Bytecoin Team. There’s a load of theories and maybe I will explore some in the future, but for now I’d like to focus on DStrange. Apparently, if you have questions, he might help. Maybe Cheesus will too. Praise the Lord! If he is still around.

We can see on the Bytecoin.org website — if true — that DStrange is a public relations guy with a major in Management / Psychology. He has a Master’s Degree in Management, from Erasmus University in Rotterdam — in Europe.  Rotterdam is in the Netherlands, for those who may not know. And all of this is “academic” as they say. Why? Again, DStrange is not likely David Miller — and he probably never attended Erasmus. Naturally, if I’m wrong, please — oh please — correct me. Show me the evidence and the error of my ways; and I will retract these accusatory words.

DStrange recently joined the team in a high action. Besides public relations DStrange develops further Bytecoin applications for business.

This is what Bytecoin.org offers us by way of a short bio — regarding DStrange. We can see that not only is DStrange a public relations guy, but he is also a developer of Bytecoin applications. Again, we must take this on faith. Oh, and ask politely for a single example of an application created by DStrange. Just one.

If we go back to the BitcoinTalk Forum to May 16, 2014, we can find an exchange between DStrange, who is also listed as David Miller, with an email address of Dstrange.m@gmail.com — and the Bytecoin Team. If you check the email address of DStrange on this verification service, you will see that DStrange’s Trust Score is 7.25. By comparison, my Trust Score for my email address (jgshorebird@gmail.com) on the same service, is only 5.5. Maybe it’s because this is not my primary email address.

DStrange’s trust score is much worse on BitcoinTalk, however. User fluffypony (Riccardo Spagni) of Monero fame, has even linked the user rethink-your-strategy’s post detailing the Bytecoin scam. (Warning: the writer is pissed.)

At any rate, DStrange is one of the few people who will actually answer the phone, so to speak. I’ve confirmed that at least he does respond on Reddit. His user name there is DStrangeM — again, if it’s not a sock puppet account.

At this point, if DStrange ever reads this blog, I’d like to ask him to tell me if he lives in the Netherlands (Holland?). It is interesting that ScamAdviser.com gives us a 2% chance that the Bytecoin.org website is in the Netherlands. Is that a result of DStrange’s influence? Or is Bytecoin hidden there?

Smooth (developer at Monero and AEON) — a well known and respected user on the BitcoinTalk Forum and many others — has leveled many allegations against DStrange and other Bytecoin Team members. And against the early code itself. One important factor was addressed on May 17, 2014, as DStrange and others were posting in support of Bytecoin.

Smooth posted:

The “optimizations” are fairly absurd. They are better described as de-un-optimizations. The straightforward implementation of the algorithm is the optimized one, not the other way around. You’d have to go out of your way to make it as slow as it was. Several highly qualified people have commented along these lines already (ignore me, I don’t know what I’m talking about).

If we look at the latest round of de-un-optimizations, most of the history of the bytecoin premine comes down to just 4-8 PCs. Or a somewhat larger number over a shorter period of time. Really, that’s all.

This one post by Smooth (above) is perhaps the most challenging for the Bytecoin team to explain. Why would they “de-un-optimize?” Logically, to grab the lion’s share of BCN early on. Is that a bad thing? I mean it was their baby, right? Now think about that for a moment. If they used the extra money to develop the coin, since the price has surged of late — probably just speculators — then they could have plowed some of it back into R&D, right? Has the money ended up in the Cayman Islands or Panama instead? We don’t know. Why? They don’t talk much and when they do — they do not ever appear to defend themselves from all of the accusations. They have, as Americans put it:

Refused to incriminate themselves in any public way.

And the history of a thing cannot be undone. It has been years, but no reliable information has surfaced about Bytecoin (BCN). It has, in no uncertain terms, staunchly refused to explain all of the inconsistencies related to the launch of Bytecoin — the premine, the apparent falsified White Papers, the assertion that the “blockchain” verifies the launch date — and the list goes on. Until that time, until Bytecoin can remove the stench from it’s hidden launch, I might continue to regurgitate these forgotten memories in an effort to dissuade or at the very least, to make users extremely cautious about BCN.

It’s high time Bytecoin Team. If you have any guts, show us the money.

 


Image: Flickr

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